Rugby Union: Campese still sharp until the last thrust

Barbarians 12 Australia 39

His adoring British fans had to wait an interminable time before David Campese rewarded their patience with a sharply taken try in the 49th minute of his last international match, an embarrassingly one-sided and unexciting affair. But once the tourists had wrapped up the victory to make it a round dozen unbeaten games on their European tour, Campese, as famous for his cutting comments as his slicing runs, wasted little time before laying into the shortcomings of British rugby.

Fifteen years at the top and 101 Wallaby Test appearances have done nothing to mellow Campese, and he needed little excuse before launching into the rugby nation he loves to hate - the Poms. "I love Barbarian rugby, you can express yourself," he said. "And that is how we play rugby, the Barbarian way. That's the Australian style, we don't have to change the style, whereas with the Barbarians a lot of players have to try to run the ball when they are not used to it."

The Campese damage did not stop there. Tim Stimpson was concussed after tackling the Wallaby wing head-on and the England and Newcastle full-back will be out of all rugby for three weeks. Campese continued: "When I have played for the Barbarians they have picked a lot of French players and they love to run the ball, but I've noticed that when there's a lot of British players it's hard because they are not used to it at high level. They love to try it, but after a while you can see they will go back into their shell. With the New Zealand Barbarians, England tried to play a different game from the one they are used to, and in the last 20 minutes off went New Zealand."

The Barbarians had needed to put up a good show in order to convince New Zealand's rugby authorities, among others, that they will be worthy opponents to round off the All Blacks' tour next season. That match is due to be played at Murrayfield, and Ian Jones has already said the All Blacks want to wrap up their tour with the traditional hoe-down. But neither he nor his fellow players have any idea what stance the New Zealand Rugby Football Union will adopt towards what appears to be an anachronistic fixture in a time of professionalism. So it really needed the Barbarians to do their bit on Saturday.

As Baa-Baas captain, Rob Andrew said his side was ill-prepared to take on a team that had lived in each other's pockets for the last eight weeks. With the Wallaby full-back Matt Burke helping himself to two tries and a total of 24 points, the tourists had done all their scoring before Andrew and his men had got off the mark.

"We were embarrassed to be 39-0 down," said Andrew. "We were all a bit disappointed because we went into the game with hopes of competing, but in the first half we weren't in it. We made too many elementary mistakes, for which against a Test team you will get punished."

Andrew acknowledged that the Barbarians could go on the endangered species list. "There is enough off-field activity to cause the Barbarians problems," he said, referring to the continuing dispute between clubs and Twickenham. "But it would be very sad if the Barbarians were lost to top international rugby."

Even Campo, reputedly one of rugby's first professionals long before the game went open, softened his attitude long enough to say: "I think it's probably one of the clubs that should stay."

Barbarians: Tries Bateman, S Quinnell; Conversion Andrew. Australia: Tries Burke 2, Roff, Campese, Horan; Conversions Burke 4; Penalties Burke 2.

BARBARIANS: T Stimpson (Newcastle & Eng); N Walker (Cardiff & Wal), A Bateman (Richmond & Wal), G Townsend (Northampton & Sco), T Underwood (Newcastle & Eng); R Andrew (capt, Newcastle & Eng), R Howley (Cardiff & Wal); N Popplewell (Newcastle & Ire), N Hewitt (Southland & NZ), D Garforth (Leicester), C Quinnell (Richmond & Wal), I Jones (North Harbour & NZ), D McIntosh (Pontypridd), N Back (Leicester & Eng), S Quinnell (Richmond & Wal). Replacements: J Stransky (Western Province & SA) for Stimpson, 22; A Moore (Richmond & Wal) for Howley, 59; M Allen (Northampton) for Townsend, 73; D Weir (Newcastle & Sco) for C Quinnell, 79.

AUSTRALIA: M Burke (S Larkham, 79); J Roff, D Herbert, T Horan (capt), D Campese; P Howard (R Tombs, 73), S Payne; D Crowley, M Caputo (M Foley, 25), A Blades (A Heath, 77), D Giffin, T Gavin, O Finnegan, D Wilson, M Brial (B Robinson 23).

Referee: E Morrison (Bristol).

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
peopleMathematician John Nash inspired the film Beautiful Mind
News
Richard Blair is concerned the trenches are falling into disrepair
newsGeorge Orwell's son wants to save war site that inspired book
Life and Style
Audrey Hepburn with Hubert De Givenchy, whose well-cut black tuxedo is a 'timeless look'
fashionIt may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
Arts and Entertainment
The pair in their heyday in 1967
music
Life and Style
fashionFrom bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant / Resourcer

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitment Consu...

Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AngularJS)

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, JavaScript, HTML...

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine