Six Nations: Ruthless Welsh are singing in the rain

Italy 9 Wales 26: Monsoon conditions can’t dampen another unspectacular but clinical display by the visitors’ to maintain their challenge for Six Nations title

Watching Wales is steadily becoming a labour of love for their supporters but at least the end result is proving worth the wait.

They kept themselves in the title race for the Six Nations with another unspectacular but ruthlessly efficient display on the road in Rome.

Amid conditions that, at times, resembled a monsoon rather than southern Italy, Wales kept a second-successive clean sheet while showing a clinical edge with tries from Jonathan Davies and  Alex Cuthbert.

After the defensive heroics in Paris, and their Grand Slam last year, it was enough to claim a fourth-successive away win in the Championship for the first time since 1979.

There was little of that Seventies flair, although even that side would surely have admired another display built on the sheer will to win at whatever cost.

It was fitting that such a limited game should have swung the visitors’ way during a calamitous five minutes at the start of the second half, when Italy fumbled a clear scoring chance before Wales pounced, and was ultimately decided following a penalty at the scrum when they grabbed a second try while Italy’s captain Martin Castrogiovanni watched from the sin bin.

It is hard to recall the last time that Rome has hosted a Six Nations game in such a downpour, although the Azzurri would have welcomed the conditions given their depenency upon the set piece.

Certainly it did not help hooker Richard Hibbard, off target with his first two lineouts, and despite possessing the heftier pack, Wales’ problems at the scrums in the opening two games resurfaced.

Formerly a platform of reliability and strength from which the likes of Jamie Roberts could thrive, the Welsh front-row has too often creaked in this tournament.

Adam Jones was penalised four times at the set piece in Paris, and while Wales were unhappy with the way they were handled against Ireland by referee Romain Poite, the French official singled out Gethin Jenkins in the game’s first scrum here. It was to prove the story of  the half.

To Wales’ frustration, Burton’s penalty not only cancelled out Halfpenny’s earlier effort, but galvanised the raucous home support, having been silenced by the visitor’s promising start.

Jones, Hibbard and Jenkins exacted their revenge with a series of devastating drives that twice enabled Halfpenny to kick Wales further ahead, to lead 9-3 on 20 minutes, though the lottery of the scrum allowed Burton to close the gap before half-time.

Given the handling skills, or lack of them, in the often torrential rain, it appeared the only way either side were going to score.

Alex Cuthbert’s fumble handed Italy an attacking position, only for them to knock-on before Burton sliced his attempt to drop a goal.

Wales fared little better and Halfpenny pushed his effort wide before half-time and then almost gifted Italy a try just after the restart.

Mike Phillips fumbled Burton’s chip over the Welsh rush defence, Italy got a boot to the ball ahead of Halfpenny but Tommaso Benvenuti failed to collect, with the line at his mercy, under pressure from Dan Biggar. Burton then sliced another drop goal from in front of the posts.

Wales wasted no time in making Italy pay, though they benefited from yet more shambolic defending.

Biggar hoisted a speculative kick but had the tenacity to chase and even regain possession. Phillips capitalised on clear space behind with a clever chip and with Edoardo Gori and Burton looking to each other to sweep up, Davies was left with time to safely collect and touch down with his first touch of the ball.

Burton clawed back a third penalty after Halfpenny had converted, but momentum inextricably swung Wales’ way when Poite ran out of patience and brandished a yellow card for Castrogiovanni after yet another scrum went to ground.

Again Wales capitalised on the chance, kicking upfield from where Biggar out-foxed the Italian defence with one well-aimed pass that found Cuthbert’s run. Italy could not lay a hand upon the wing once he was clear and he darted into the corner for the seventh try of his still-blooming Test career.

Halfpenny guided his conversion through the uprights from out wide and Wales were too smart, and Italy too limited, to make the final  19 minutes nothing less than  a formality.

Italy captain Martin Castrogiovanni had no complaints after seeing his side suffer a second successive comprehensive Six Nations reversal.

He said: “We conceded nine points from scrums, which is my problem as well as the team’s. I need to work on that.

“The referee is always right. If we had done what we were told and also managed our kicking better, maybe the referee wouldn’t have mattered so much.”

Italy:  A Masi, G Venditti, T Benvenuti, G Canale (G Garcia, 64), L McLean, K Burton, E Gori (T Botes, 65); A Lo Cicero  (A De Marchi, 55), L Ghiraldini (D Giazzon, 55), M Castrogiovanni, A Pavanello, F Minto (Q Geldenhuys, 55), A Zanni  (P Derbyshire, 70), S Favaro, R Vosawei (L Cittadini, 65-69).  

Wales: L Halfpenny, A Cuthbert, J Davies, J Roberts  (S Williams, 70), G North, D Biggar (J Hook, 69), M Phillips (L Williams, 64); G Jenkins (P James, 46), R Hibbard  (K Owens, 52), A Jones (C Mitchell, 74), A Coombs (A Jones, 52), I Evans, R Jones (S Warburton, 69), J Tipuric, T Faletau.  Referee: R Poite (France)

Suggested Topics
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
AKB48 perform during one of their daily concerts at Tokyo’s Akihabara theatre
musicJapan's AKB48 are one of the world’s most-successful pop acts
News
Ian Thorpe has thanked his supporters after the athlete said in an interview that he is gay
people
News
The headstone of jazz great Miles Davis at Woodlawn Cemetery in New York
news
Arts and Entertainment
Brendan O'Carroll has brought out his female alter-ego Agnes Brown for Mrs Brown's Boys D'Movie
filmComedy holds its place at top of the UK box office
News
newsBear sweltering in zoo that reaches temperatures of 40 degrees
Arts and Entertainment
Professor Kathy Willis will showcase plants from the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew
radioPlants: From Roots to Riches has been two years in the making
Arts and Entertainment
TV The follow-up documentary that has got locals worried
Arts and Entertainment
Eminem's daughter Hailie has graduated from high school
music
Arts and Entertainment
Original Netflix series such as Orange Is The New Black are to benefit from a 'substantial' increase in investment
TVHoax announcement had caused outrage
Life and Style
Swimsuit, £245, by Agent Provocateur
fashion

Diving in at the deep end is no excuse for shirking the style stakes

News
One Direction star Harry Styles who says he has no plans to follow his pal Cara Delevingne down the catwalk.
peopleManagement confirms rumours singer is going it alone are false
Caption competition
Caption competition
Daily World Cup Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream as Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream

Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil
Saharan remains may be evidence of the first race war, 13,000 years ago

The first race war, 13,000 years ago?

Saharan remains may be evidence of oldest large-scale armed conflict
Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Researchers hope eye tests can spot ‘biomarkers’ of the disease
Sex, controversy and schoolgirl schtick

Meet Japan's AKB48

Pop, sex and schoolgirl schtick make for controversial success
Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor