Andy Murray plays down Wimbledon roof complaints

Andy Murray again found life tougher than expected under the Centre Court roof at Wimbledon but the British number one's only complaint was that it makes things too perfect.

The world number four was a heavy favourite to beat Daniel Gimeno-Traver in round one but he was given a real battle for a set and a half by an opponent playing inspired tennis, before reeling off 15 games in a row to triumph 4-6 6-3 6-0 6-0.



It was Murray's second time playing under the roof after he and Stanislas Wawrinka contested the first complete match indoors in 2009.



On that occasion the Scot struggled with the conditions and needed five sets to come through, but he insisted the experience is different rather than unpleasant.



Murray said: "Last time I made a comment on it and for some reason it came out (in the press) as I hated it - I never said that. The roof changes the conditions.



"If anything it's almost too perfect. There's no wind, no sun, no elements to contend with. It's different grass-court tennis.



"And, like you saw in the first set, he was able to hit a lot of huge forehands, which it's normally harder to do when it's a little bit breezy outside or whatever.



"It definitely slows the court down a little bit. But it was a good match. I thought it was a good standard of match and a good atmosphere in there as well."



Gimeno-Traver, the Spanish number 11 at 59th in the world, had won only four games in their previous meeting in Valencia two years ago but for much of the first two sets an upset really did look possible.



The 25-year-old was pinning Murray back with huge groundstrokes and nailing his serve when he needed to, and it was not until the fourth seed broke for 5-3 in the second set that he could afford to relax in any way.



That was certainly the turning point, with Gimeno-Traver sensing his chance had gone and Murray starting to fire winners at will, and it was to the Scot's credit that he wrapped up victory in such decisive fashion.



The match proved a perfect test of his resolve to keep his frustration in check on court, and Murray, who next faces either Tobias Kamke or Blaz Kavcic, passed with flying colours.



He added: "It was tough because I was having quite a lot of chances and I wasn't able to convert any of them for the first set and a half.



"And then I did get myself fired up when I managed to get the break, and after that I didn't lose a game. So I did a good job of that and it's something that I need to keep on improving on because the matches are going to get tougher. I'm going to go through a lot of those situations during the tournament."



Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before