Andy Roddick tired of US tennis questions

Andy Roddick, understandably, is rather tired of hearing the question, in one form or another: What's wrong with U.S. tennis?

When a local reporter raised the subject at a tournament in Rome last week, Roddick replied wryly: "No bigger crisis than Italian tennis."



A little later, Roddick added: "As far as harping on American tennis, I think we're kind of a victim of our own success over the years in the sport. If you still stack us up against most countries, we're coming out ahead."



Well, yes, that is true. What's also true is this: The United States has reached a low point in tennis. Not merely because the country no longer churns out new champions with regularity, but also because it is not really relevant at the top of the game right now.



Earlier this month, for the first time in more than 35 years of computerized rankings, no player from the U.S. appeared in the ATP or WTA top 10. Plus, the last American man to win a Grand Slam singles title was Roddick, at the 2003 U.S. Open — 29 major tournaments ago. If, as expected, that drought continues at the French Open, which starts Sunday in Paris, the gap will equal the longest in history for U.S. men — a 30-Slam shutout from 1955-63.



To Roddick's point, that's nothing compared to what some others are enduring: Andy Murray has lost three major finals in his bid to become the first British man since 1936 to win a Grand Slam title.



Yet the recent American problems are a stark change for a nation that has produced players such as Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Arthur Ashe, Don Budge, Bill Tilden, the Williams sisters, Lindsay Davenport, Tracy Austin, Chris Evert and Billie Jean King, to name only some.



"We're so used to having champions for the last, oh, century," said Venus Williams, owner of seven major singles titles. "Right now is something we're not used to."



When it comes to taking home trophies, Roddick and the rest of the American men have been forced to deal with the same obstacle everyone else has for the past several years: The consistent excellence of a couple of guys from Switzerland (Roger Federer) and Spain (Rafael Nadal).



Those two countries — well, those two men — alone account for 24 of the 29 Grand Slam men's singles titles since Roddick's victory in New York. The others have gone to Serbia (two to Novak Djokovic, whose Australian Open championship in January is part of his 37-0 record heading into the French Open), Argentina (one each to Juan Martin del Potro and Gaston Gaudio) and Russia (Marat Safin). Roddick has come close, playing in four Grand Slam finals from 2004-09, but losing each to Federer.



"Clearly, the game has been dominated by a couple of players," said former U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe, John's brother, "and clearly, we have a lot of work to do."



In this week's rankings, there's only one man or woman in the top 10: No. 10 Mardy Fish, followed by Roddick at No. 11. The top American women are Serena Williams at 17th, and Venus Williams at 29th; neither has played in months. Bethanie Mattek-Sands is next at 36th.



Here's another indication of where things stand: Some of the biggest bits of news connected to U.S. tennis in the run-up to Roland Garros have been the withdrawals of the Williams sisters; the release of a book about John McEnroe's rivalry with Bjorn Borg decades ago; and a public back-and-forth between Donald Young, a 21-year-old American who recently returned to the top 100, and the U.S. Tennis Association, a spat involving a French Open wild-card entry he didn't get and a nasty tweet he posted in frustration.



As for the American men's title chances in Paris, consider these career records there: Roddick is 9-9, Fish is 2-5, 26th-ranked Sam Querrey is 0-4, and 39th-ranked John Isner is 2-2. They have one fourth-round match in 20 French Open appearances among them; that was in 2009 by Roddick, whose participation this year was put in doubt by a recent shoulder injury.



There are a total of nine U.S. men in the top 100 this week, the same number as Germany and France — and five fewer than Spain (a country with a population about one-sixth that of the United States). There are only four Americans in the ATP top 50, the same number as Argentina and only one more than Italy; Spain has 10 in the top 50.



"The game got so global just in the past 10, 15 years. ... Tennis in America has slowed down. It's not as dominant. It doesn't make me feel sad or angry. It's just a reality check," said Sampras, who won 14 Grand Slam titles and finished No. 1 in the rankings a record six years in a row. "We're fine. We have some good young players. But they're not Grand Slam winners and they're not No. 1 in the world, so it might take some time."



On the women's side, the U.S. Fed Cup team lost 5-0 to Germany in April and was eliminated from the competition's top tier for the first time, meaning the 17-time champion Americans now need to win their way back to the elite level.



And no American woman has won a WTA or Grand Slam title since Serena Williams at Wimbledon in July, a span of 50 tournaments. During that stretch, only one woman from the U.S., Mattek-Sands, even has reached a final.



"If I knew why other countries were having success, we'd be copying it quickly," Venus Williams said. "It's happening right now, but it doesn't mean it's something that'll be forever."

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