British tax laws driving Nadal away

 

Shanghai

Rafael Nadal believes that Britain might need to change its tax laws in order to keep the prestigious season-ending ATP World Tour Finals in London. Speaking here last night after his 7-6, 6-3 defeat by Germany's Florian Mayer left Andy Murray as the top seed in the Shanghai Masters, Nadal said that playing in tournaments in Britain was becoming "more and more complicated".

Overseas sportsmen are taxed on their worldwide endorsement earnings for every day they spend in Britain, which has already caused athletes like Usain Bolt not to compete in the country. The World Tour Finals are being staged at the O2 Arena until 2013. The tournament has been a huge success in London, but it could move elsewhere when the present deal expires.

When asked if he felt the situation might lead players to want to go to another city, Nadal said London was "a fantastic event" but said that the tax position was a "really negative factor". He added: "If that changes, the chances to keep the World Tour Finals in London are going to be very, very high."

Nadal has decided not to play at Queen's Club next summer in preparation for Wimbledon and will instead compete in the tournament at Halle in Germany. He denied that the amount of appearance money being paid by Halle was the reason. "The tax regime from the UK is complicating a lot of things," he added. "The problem is I can lose money if I go [to Queen's] to play for one week."

Murray, chasing a third successive tournament victory, moved into the quarter-finals with a 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 victory over Stanislas Wawrinka. In today's quarter-finals he will play the world No 124, Australia's Matthew Ebden, who enjoyed the biggest victory of his career when he beat Gilles Simon, the world No 12.

The winner will face Ukraine's Alexandr Dolgopolov (world No 18) or Japan's Kei Nishikori (world No 47) in tomorrow's semi-finals. The highest ranked player in the other half of the draw is the world No 5, Spain's David Ferrer.

Torrential rain meant that matches were played with the roof over the Qi Zhong stadium closed. With the balls flying, Murray needed to make a rapid adjustment to the conditions. He also had to survive a gutsy fightback in the second set by Wawrinka.

"I got myself pumped up right at the beginning of the third set," Murray said after winning his 12th match in a row. "Stan was playing very well. I was trying to control the ball. Especially in the middle of the second set, I was really struggling. I really had to make sure I got my feet moving."

Ebden, 23, has been making steady progress in recent months and is now the Australian No 2 behind Bernard Tomic. In reaching the quarter-finals here he has already guaranteed himself $77,800 (£49,700), the biggest pay cheque of his career.

Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss