David Ashdown's Wimbledon Picture Diary

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Each day of the Wimbledon championship The Independent's award winning photographer David Ashdown has been selecting his favourite images and explaining the story behind the lens. Here's the diary in full.

Day 13

It was a classic Men's final, maybe even the best ever. Very different from the Ladies final the day before!

I was in the pit on the east side of Centre Court for the first set, a good place to get a variety of shots as you can see both ends of the court.

But for the rest of the match I was on the little platform looking down the court. I like that position because in a final the score board can come into play, and that is what happened this time.

Click the image above to find more images and diary entries from David Ashdown.

Just after Federer had won, he shook hands with Roddick and the score board still had his advantage on it, but when he walked back on to the court it had changed to 14-16 - the final score.

I think most photographers were shooting on long lens' - 400mm plus. I had taken a picture of match point with my 500mm which worked very well. He jumped into the air facing me, so I had a nice winning moment picture.

Because of the score, the match became historic, so it was very important to get a picture with the score board and some of the court. It is important to try and see the bigger picture (no pun intended) of the event rather that trying to get yet another picture of the winner.

This image of Federer with his arms up and Roddick about to sit down with the final score in the background sums the whole match up.

It was taken on a Nikon D3 camera with a 70-200mm F2.8 zoom lens 1/500 second at F5.6.

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