Lords of the lawn show their expertise

Shock results prove value of grass-court pedigree in early rounds of tournament

It is said that Wimbledon's courts have been slowed down so much that there is little difference between competing here and playing on the hard courts at the US or Australian Opens. It is said that the uniformity of playing surfaces and the advances in string and racket technology have produced a generation of baseline metronomes.

It is said that serve and volley is all but dead and that today's leading men play in much the same way – with much the same results – wherever they are playing and whatever the surface. Try telling that to Juan Martin del Potro, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Nikolay Davydenko, the three highest men's seeds to go out in the first week of Wimbledon. In the last year Del Potro has climbed 60 places to No 5 in the world rankings, but for the third Wimbledon in succession the Argentine went out in the second round, swept aside by Lleyton Hewitt (below), a former champion at the All England Club and still a master of grass-court tennis despite his position at No 56 in the world order.

Tsonga, in contrast to Del Potro, has a decent record on grass, but the world No 9 came up against the man mountain of men's tennis, Ivo Karlovic, who proved that a huge serve remains the most telling weapon in the thick of a grass-court battle. The Croat, who is the tallest player in the game at 6ft 10in, smashed 46 aces past Tsonga, who dropped his serve only once but still lost in four sets.

Davydenko, twice a semi-finalist at both the US and French Opens, is one of the most consistent players in the game and had won all eight of his previous matches against Tomas Berdych. However, in seven previous visits to Wimbledon the Russian has been past the second round only once, when he reached the fourth round two years ago. The result? Berdych, a former quarter-finalist and through to the second week here for the third time in four years, beat a player nine places above him in the rankings for the loss of seven games.

The differences between playing surfaces may be less of a factor than they were in the past, but the evidence of the first week here underlines the fact that grass-court pedigree still counts, which is why Roger Federer remains the favourite to win his sixth All England Club title next weekend, particularly in the absence of the injured world No 1 and 2008 champion, Rafael Nadal.

Before the tournament one of the big questions was whether Federer's success at the French Open, which completed his set of Grand Slam titles, would see him arrive in a more relaxed mood than ever, or whether he would show the nerves of a man knowing that victory would take him past Pete Sampras's all-time record of 14 Grand Slam crowns. Through the first week Federer has looked as calm as a Swiss lake on a still summer's afternoon.

Who can stop the five-times champion? Robin Soderling, beaten by Federer in the French Open final three weeks ago, is next. The Swede might suffer fewer nerves than on their last meeting, but it is hard to see a different outcome. Karlovic's thunderbolts or Fernando Verdasco's crashing forehands could pose a threat in the quarter-finals, but Novak Djokovic would probably present the greater test in the semi-finals.

Djokovic, who lost his world No 3 ranking to Andy Murray two months ago, has not had the easiest of times since winning his first Grand Slam title at the Australian Open last year. He was beaten by Marat Safin in the second round here 12 months ago, but since losing his first set last week to Julien Benneteau has won nine sets in a row. Today Dudi Sela should provide no greater threat than his 5ft 9in frame would suggest, while you would not expect Tommy Haas or Igor Andreev to trouble Djokovic unduly in the quarter-finals.

Hewitt, who is in the other half of the draw, is the only former winner in the field apart from Federer. While the Australian remains a fine player on grass it remains to be seen whether he can sustain the level he reached in beating Del Potro. The 2002 champion's fourth-round match today against Radek Stepanek should be a joy for the purists, while a potential quarter-final against Andy Roddick, who must first beat Berdych, would be an intriguing contest. Roddick's grass-court record is every bit as impressive as Hewitt's. The American lost to Federer in the 2004 and 2005 Wimbledon finals and, like Hewitt, is a four-times winner at Queen's Club.

Although Roddick's three subsequent appearances at the All England Club have ended in comparative failure the world No 6 is looking in his best shape for years, his new coach, Larry Stefanki, having advised him to lose weight over the winter.

On form and ranking Roddick would be the favourite to emerge from his quarter of the draw, while the same criteria would see Murray line up as his semi-final opponent. Murray's draw looked good a week ago and has become more enticing since the defeats of Safin and Fernando Gonzalez, who could have met him in the quarter-finals, the stage at which the Chilean beat him in the French Open.

Gonzalez's conqueror, Juan Carlos Ferrero, now meets Gilles Simon, the world No 7, the winner to face Murray or Stanislas Wawrinka in the quarter-finals. Murray beat Ferrero in the semi-finals at Queen's Club a fortnight ago, has not dropped a set in his last three matches against Simon and has a 6-2 winning record against Roddick, having won their last two meetings.

None of the players will be looking further than their next match, but for the rest of us there is the enthralling prospect of a Federer-Murray final. There has been nothing in the first week to suggest a more likely line-up.

Court circular: First-week highlights at the All England Club

Men

*Player of the week: The five-times champion Roger Federer, who hit top form from the moment he set foot on his favourite lawn in the world.

* Performance of the week: Lleyton Hewitt's masterclass in victory over Juan Martin del Potro, the world No 5.

* Statistic of the week: Ivo Karlovic's 46 aces, which pummelled Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, the No 9 seed, into submission.

* Surprise of the week: Israel's Dudi Sela reaching the fourth round. The 24-year-old had never won a tour match on grass before last week.

* Quote of the week: "Yeah, it's surprising. I mean, you don't get that every day." Andy Murray on receiving a letter from the Queen congratulating him on his victory at Queen's Club.

Women

* Player of the week: Venus Williams, who has looked all but unbeatable in her three straight-sets wins.

* Performance of the week:The straight-sets victory by the German teenager Sabine Lisicki over Svetlana Kuznetsova, the French Open champion.

* Statistic of the week: The number of games – none – dropped by Victoria Azarenka against Ioana Raluca Olaru.

* Surprise of the week: American Melanie Oudin, ranked No 124, beating Jelena Jankovic, a recent world No 1.

* Quote of the week: "You don't understand the heat in Florida. I needed a sweater out there." Venus Williams after beating Carla Suarez Navarro on a scorching Saturday.

News
people
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Jeremy Clarkson has rejected criticisms of his language, according to BBC director of television Danny Cohen
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Judi Dench appeared at the Hay Festival to perform excerpts from Shakespearean plays
tvJudi Dench and Hugh Bonneville join Benedict Cumberbatch in BBC Shakespeare adaptations
PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
fashion David Beckham fronts adverts for his underwear collection
Arts and Entertainment
Exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Metz - 23 May 2012
art
News
i100Most young people can't
Extras
indybest
Sport
Is this how Mario Balotelli will cruise into Liverpool?
football
Arts and Entertainment
Alfred Molina, left, and John Lithgow in a scene from 'Love Is Strange'
film
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home