Safina quickly moves into 2nd round at French Open

Top-seeded Dinara Safina quickly worked her way into the second round of the French Open today, routing Anne Keothavong of Britain 6-0, 6-0.

The Russian favorite sprayed shots to all parts of the court at Roland Garros, giving her opponent few chances on Day 2 of the tournament.

"I was just playing point by point, game by game, and it ended up like this," said Safina, half of the only brother-sister combination alongside Marat Safin to have served as the No 1-ranked player in the world.

Keothavong had a couple of chances on center court, but she wasted two break points in the third game of the first set, and led 40-0 in the fourth game of the second but couldn't hold on.

"When that's happening to you all you want to do is get on the scoreboard, but I wasn't able to do that," Keothavong said. "It just kept getting harder and harder."

During the changeover for the final game, Keothavong sat in her chair with a French Open towel draped over her head. She emerged from the short break and quickly trailed 0-40, giving Safina three match points.

But Keothavong saved them all, on unforced errors from Safina, and even held two game points.

Safina wasted a fourth match point by hitting long and converted the fifth with a forehand winner down the line.

"After I (shook) her hand, she said: 'At least you could give me one game,"' Safina said. "I could imagine it's not nice to feel (like that) on the court, but I was just so into myself."

Victoria Azarenka and Ana Ivanovic won 6-0, 6-0 at the French Open last year, and Serena Williams did it in 2003.

Safina took over as the top-ranked women's player in April, but she has yet to win a Grand Slam title. She lost in last year's French Open final, and also came within a match of winning the Australian Open this season.

No. 29 Agnes Szavay of Hungary also advanced Monday, beating Corinna Dentoni of Italy 6-3, 6-4.

On the men's side, 10th-seeded Nikolay Davydenko of Russia beat Stefan Koubek of Austria 6-2, 6-1, 6-4, and Mikhail Youzhny of Russia defeated Gilles Muller of Luxembourg 7-6 (2), 6-1, 6-4.

Later Monday, defending men's champion Rafael Nadal and three-time finalist Roger Federer are scheduled to play on center court. Venus Williams and Maria Sharapova are to play in the women's draw.

On Sunday, former top-ranked player Amelie Mauresmo exited early from yet another French Open, this time losing in the first round to Anna-Lena Groenefeld 6-4, 6-3.

"I couldn't find the right pace or the distance I needed," the Frenchwoman said after losing on center court. "I don't know. My performance was not good enough. I couldn't neutralize her, and I thought this would be the most important aspect."

Mauresmo has had her worst Grand Slam results at her home tournament, only getting as far as the quarterfinals on two occasions. She won both the Australian Open and Wimbledon in 2006, and reached the semifinals at the U.S. Open that same year.

If it was the pressure of playing in front of her many fans that caused her to struggle Sunday, it wasn't something she wanted to talk about.

"Don't know. I don't know. I don't know," the 16th-seeded Mauresmo said. "I can't give you anything this evening. You know, I don't want to speak. That's all. I'm quite clear."

BUY WIMBLEDON TICKETS

Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935