Swearing at the Australian Open? I don’t give a s***, says Andy Murray

British No 1 apologises for bad language on court – but denies any pledge to clean up his act

You have been warned: The courts will not be the only things that are blue when it comes to Andy Murray’s Australian Open matches. The world No 3 has found himself at the centre of whether his language on the court is suitable for a family audience after his cursing was picked up by microphones at the Brisbane International tournament yesterday.

And despite promising to watch his Ps and Qs recently, he brushed off any pledge to wash his mouth out with soap if any industrial language gets picked up on court at the rod Laver Arena.

Murray, who beat Uzbekistan’s Denis Istomin to book himself a place in tomorrow morning’s Brisbane International semi-final against Kei Nishikori, is known for wearing his heart on his sleeve - particularly when things are not going to plan in a match.

But when asked whether he will attempt to tone down his language in Melbourne, he said: “I don’t really know how that will go, to be honest. A lot of times I get asked after matches about it. It can get picked up on the microphone or whatever. No-one has mentioned anything to me (in Brisbane) yet but the microphones at the Aussie Open are all around the court, so we’ll see.”

Last month the US Open and Olympic champion said he would try and curb his cursing: ““Obviously, me saying ‘s***’ or whatever is bad and wrong, and it’s something I want to try to stop doing.”

But his tone was far less conciliatory after his win over Istomin - and he said other players are a lot worse when it comes to swearing like sailors while in the heat of a match, but they are not chastised for their utterances because they let fly in other languages.

“Where it (the pledge to stop swearing) came from was when I got asked a question,” he said. “I was doing an interview over the phone. I got asked about swearing on the court. I said ‘obviously I don’t mean to do it. I don’t want to do it. Sometimes you get frustrated and you do and obviously I will try to stop’.

“I didn’t make any promises or guarantees that I was going to. Then it came out that I’ve said this year I will stop swearing. What I also said was that a lot of players swear on the court and a lot of people say a lot worse things than me - in other languages. It doesn’t get picked up the same.

“So where I would obviously love to stop doing it, I try not to. But I can’t guarantee it.”

Meanwhile Roger Federer, the world No 2, is confident his lack of match time will leave him “refreshed” leading up to the Australian Open. Federer has not played competitively since November but he said: “I am very happy that the year is starting. It’s a bit of a different preparation for the Australian Open this year but I’m confident I am mentally refreshed, which I am, and physically I am fine and that I will play a good Australian Open.”

BUY WIMBLEDON TICKETS

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Greece says 'No': A night of huge celebrations in Athens as voters decisively back Tsipras and his anti-austerity stance in historic referendum

Greece referendum

Greeks say 'No' to austerity and plunge Europe into crisis
Ten years after the 7/7 terror attacks, is Britain an altered state?

7/7 bombings anniversary

Ten years after the terror attacks, is Britain an altered state?
Beautiful evening dresses are some of the loveliest Donatella has created

Versace haute couture review

Beautiful evening dresses are some of the loveliest Donatella has ever created
No hope and no jobs, so Gaza's young risk their lives, climb the fence and run for it

No hope and no jobs in Gaza

So the young risk their lives and run for it
Fashion apps: Retailers roll together shopping and social networking for mobile customers

Fashion apps

Retailers roll together shopping and social networking for mobile customers
The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate