Richmond, the American International University in London

 

 

History: The original Richmond College was founded in 1843 and remained a part of the University of London until 1972, when Richmond, the American International University in London was established on its campus as an independent, not-for-profit liberal arts university.

Address: The first two years of study are generally spent at the six-acre Richmond Hill Campus, where modern accommodation and offices have joined the original neo-gothic building. For the final two years of study, students move to the university's city campus in Kensington.

Ambience: An American university in the UK's capital city. The Richmond campus is set at the top of Richmond Hill - one of London's most sought-after areas - right next to the spectacular Richmond deer park and near to Kew Gardens. Kensington is one of London's swankiest districts with various luxury shops, bars, restaurants and museums plus beautiful scenery across Hyde Park.

Who's the boss? Professor John Annette is the sixth president of Richmond.

Prospectus: 020 8332 9000, visit the website here and follow on Twitter @richmonduni.

UCAS code: R20

What you need to know

Easy to get into? The admissions process is rigorous. Students are required not only to submit good grades, but a personal statement and personal recommendations from their teachers. You'll need a portfolio with 20 images of your most recent work if you're applying for BA Art, Design and Media. For more information on entry requirements, click here.

Vital statistics: On completion of its courses, students qualify for both a British BA and an American BA. Courses are offered in four main areas: communication and the arts;; business and economics and humanities and social sciences; and are taught using the American Liberal Arts system. Around 1,200 students attend the university and the vast majority come from around the world. The Richmond is validated by The Open University in Britain and accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education in the US.

Added value: Richmond offers its students high contact hours, small class sizes and a degree that is flexible and regcognised throughout the world. Their students go on to leading graduate schools across the globe from the LSE to Harvard and Yale. They have an internship office which assists students in finding placements with leading companies in relevant fields. Students also have the opportunity to study abroad at Richmond’s study centres in Italy.

Any accommodation? Yes - prices are from £8,100 to £9,500 per year, including 18 meals per week. Self-catering is also available.

Cheap to live there? London is an expensive place to live, as any major city is, and Richmond and Kensington are two of the capital's most expensive areas. However, the University provides affordable accommodation for its students and as this is London there are always things to do on a budget.

Transport links: Richmond Hill is an easy journey to the Kensington campus, which is connected by the London underground, buses and overground trains. The Kensington Campus is within easy walking distance of many of London's main attractions.

Fees: Undergraduate degrees cost £7,700 per year for UK/EU students, with international students paying £13,500.

Bursaries and scholarships: Richmond has a variety of bursaries, scholarships and grants are available depending on a student’s academic achievement or need. The average range is between £700 to £3,000.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: There are a number of on-campus activities that are planned every year from the famous start and end of term parties to International Night. London itself offers students an amazing assortment of activities from the theatre, pubs, clubs, shopping, and museums, to major sporting events and more.

Sporting facilities: Plenty of opportunities to join sports clubs with a range to please most.

Glittering alumni: Bobby Chin, celebrity chef; actor Bill Paxton; Shwan Al Mulla CBE; congressman Russ Carnahan.

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