Student finance: make money while you study

 

Living as a student can be an expensive affair. Perhaps you're sick of simply cutting corners with your spending, and bored of eating beans every night - you want to actually earn some money! Here are some ideas to get you started.

Get a part-time job
If you’re at university, chances are you’re in quite a good small town or city with a high street or perhaps a shopping centre. These places are teeming with retail shops and restaurants that rely on a constant stream of staff working on a part-time or casual basis. Turn up with a smile and your CV.
Pros: It’s regular money coming in so you know you can count on it being there every week and you can budget more efficiently. You will find a new group of people to socialise with, too.
Cons: There’s a lot of competition, you might be asked to work unsociable hours, and the work is rarely inspiring.
Hassle rating: 2/5
Earning potential: Minimum wage is £4.98 per hour for people aged 18-20. Workers aged 21 and over should get a minimum of £6.08, and as of October 2012, this is £6.19 per hour. All jobs should pay these wages - if a job advertises for less than minimum wage, they are breaking the law.

Sell stuff you don’t want on eBay
Everyone hoards stuff that they feel emotionally attached to for some reason. Be brutally honest with yourself: Do you really need it? Are you going to use something you bought four years ago, if you haven’t used it already? Try eBay, Craigslist or eBid (which doesn’t charge for listings).
Pros: From time to time, you might find that something you were going to chuck away is actually worth something. You also get to de-clutter your environment which can only be a good thing.
Cons: It’s really, really time-consuming, and you pay a percentage to Paypal and eBay for using them. You have to have exquisite attention to detail when describing your items; buy packaging; live conveniently near a post office; and have the patience of a saint when dealing with complaints.
Hassle rating: 4/5
Earning potential: Anything from 99p to £££s if you get lucky!

Become a mystery shopper
Large retail businesses need to know that they are providing the best experience for their customers – and this is where you come in. Mystery shoppers go in to stores and assess them based on any given number of factors: Cleanliness, staff helpfulness, etc. Try ESA, Checkout, and Storecheckers.
Pros: Convenient and easy way of earning money if you go to the shops regularly anyway.
Cons: You only get paid once you submit a report. It might be difficult to find tasks near you, and it won’t be regular money.
Hassle rating: 1/5
Earning potential: They all pay different rates but £5-30 per assignment is a rough guide.

Tutor others in your degree subject
Concerned parents want their children to do well at their GCSEs and A-Levels, and if they can afford it they’ll pay someone to tutor them to get them through the exams. It may as well be you. Try Bright Young Things, The Tutor Website, and UK Tutors.
Pros: You work with young people. It’s in your own time, which means it’s flexible. And teaching can be a very rewarding thing to do.
Cons: You work with young people. You may have to travel to get to their house, or you may have to make room for them to go to yours. You’ll also need a CRB check – this isn’t exactly a ‘con’, but something to consider.
Hassle rating: 2/5
Earning potential: Up to you, but from £10 an hour. If you’re good, or happen to have a highly specialised degree and work for really concerned parents, you can earn as much as £50 per hour.

Work remotely
If you want to do the work and earn money the good old honest way, but with minimal effort – ie you don’t even have to leave your seat! – then working remotely/online is for you, particularly if you’re a creative. Try studentgems.com.
Pros: You don’t have to deal with anyone or go anywhere, so you save in travel expenses. Equally, you can do it when you're not at home.
Cons: You have to be very organised and able to manage your own time – no point in doing this if you’re a big procrastinator and struggle to get things done. You have to figure out if you are being ripped off on your own – be realistic with your ability and the workload you expect.
Hassle rating: 3/5
Earning potential: Varies, depending on the skills you have and what jobs there are that need doing.

These should get you going, but if you have any more ideas, comment below!

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Student

Recruitment Genius: Graduate Software Developer

£18000 - £28000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Graduate Software Developer i...

AER Teachers: Graduate Primary TA - West London - Autumn

£65 - £75 per day + competitive rates: AER Teachers: The school is seeking gra...

AER Teachers: Graduate Secondary TA - West London

£65 - £75 per day + competitive rates: AER Teachers: The school is seeking gra...

Ashdown Group: Graduate Developer - Surrey - £25,000

£20000 - £25000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Graduate Developer - Croy...

SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past