Sport Oscar Ustari

The goalkeeper is expected to take his place on the bench for Wednesday's Capital One Cup semi-final

Willey shows way to Seville

Swimming

Haag heads off with high hopes

RUGBY UNION

Dance: Paco Pena Flamenco Dance Company Peacock Theatre, London

Paco Pena, the mild man of flamenco, makes a low-key entrance 10 minutes into his new show, Arte y Pasion, and, apart from a few guitar solos of quicksilver artistry, takes a back seat to his company. The show at the Peacock is an attempt to display the various elements of flamenco and the wide range of moods within it, presenting it without fuss or artifice on a set whose atmosphere rests (wisely) on a simple lighting design and three arches that hint at Andalusia's moorish past.

It's good to sing

Paco Pena (right) is a flamenco artist with a mission. To take back the initiative from the fashionable crop of flamboyant dancers and bring the voice to the fore.

Namesakes; Where is ... Granada?

Granada, Spain

Ole!

A couple dancing the tango are clasped together as one and move with a single snake-like intelligence; a couple dancing flamenco merely occupy the same cage. ''In flamenco you can dance with a man, with a woman or with a guitar,'' says Isabel Munoz whose five-year photographic study of the dance demonstrates that while flamenco may be about passion, it isn't really about sex. People think it is, and it's an easy mistake to make: buxom ladies lifting their skirts in the direction of handsome young bloods in dangerously tight trousers cause the uninitiated to assume that horizontal desires cannot be far away. Not a bit of it. Flamenco at its best is a solo performance, a celebration of the selfish passions of pride and joy and despair. The dancers may occasionally perform in mixed pairs but only so that one monologue may interrupt another. There is no chemistry, no exchange.

LETTER : Conservation in the suburbs

WHEN I win the lottery I shall buy a house on the Mapesbury estate, Brent, and gladly run the risk of a £20,000 fine in order to paint my property Costa del Sol white, build a very large UPVC porch (and even bigger UPVC conservatory), replace all wooden doors and frames with plastic (and mock leaded lights) - oh, and if I can find space, some Vera Duckworth cladding.

THEATRE / When violence masquerades as love: Paul Taylor on Le Cid, Corneille's tale of conflicting honour and desire, at the National's Cottesloe Theatre in London

Falstaff famously belittled the idea of honour: 'What is honour? A word. What is in that word honour? What is that honour? Air. A trim reckoning] Who hath it? He that died a' Wednesday. Does he feel it? No. Does he hear it? No.' - considerations that prompt the fat knight to end his mock catechism by saying he'll therefore have none of it. When you've sat through two hours of Pierre Corneille's Le Cid, Falstaff's cynical, easy-going attitude may begin to strike you as a wonderfully refreshing alternative to the sort of tortured, unrelaxing extremism on display there. Taking place in Seville, at the court of the King of Castile, the play shows you a society where both sexes are trapped in a rigid male code of honour and torn apart as their ideals battle with their desires.

Letter: Mr Waldegrave's owl

Sir: I was surprised by the puzzlement which greeted William Waldegrave's reference to the 'owl of Minerva' which 'flies only at dusk', during a speech on the Civil Service reforms reported by Andrew Marr (14 July). He was of course alluding to a famous passage in G. W. F. Hegel's Philosophy of Right. The 'owl of Minerva' stands for philosophy itself. Hegel uses the metaphor to illustrate the point that philosophy is merely its own time comprehended in thought, a necessarily limited conceptualisation of temporary actuality. Hegel proceeds to highlight the perils which confront philosophers in 'issuing instructions on how the world ought to be' from a position of such relatively premature understanding. Doubtless Mr Waldegrave is aware of such dangers as he prepares to remodel the Civil Service along what he deems more 'efficient' lines.

Voters' anger is brought home to Gonzalez: Elections in the Spanish PM's stronghold promise trouble, writes Phil Davison in Malaga

UNDER normal circumstances, the Spanish Prime Minister, Felipe Gonzalez, would be likely to survive the predicted hammering for his ruling Socialists in tomorrow's European vote. Unfortunately for Mr Gonzalez, he also faces the prospect of a historic setback in simultaneous regional elections in Andalusia, his home region and traditional stronghold.

Kingmaker for Mexico 'exiled' to US: Phil Davison in Mexico City reports on some mysterious developments within the beleaguered ruling party

HE WAS the power behind the throne, a shadowy eminence grise who shielded, advised and, some say, manipulated President Carlos Salinas de Gortari. There had even been talk, since Jose Cordoba Montoya was born in France to exiled Spanish parents, of changing the constitution to allow him to hold the nation's highest office.

Christ crucified on the streets of Seville

Hooded penitents carrying a huge crucifix yesterday in a traditional Holy Week procession.

BRIDGE / The partner who plays perfectly

THE tension always mounts when a grand slam has been reached. Even if you have a tempting alternative, a trump lead (assuming your opponents know what they are doing) is often best. On this deal from the recent Marbella tournament, it certainly gave declarer a few problems.

Spain awaits Gonzalez's 'new look' government: Left comes out from the shadows to help Prime Minister win

IT WILL be at least three weeks, probably more, before Spaniards learn what kind of government Felipe Gonzalez has in store. That is when the new legislature meets.

Troubles for 'the local boy': Spain's Prime Minister is losing support on his home territory, writes Phil Davison in Seville

ANDALUSIA, the most populous of Spain's 17 regions, is known for producing sweet, juicy oranges, fine, dry sherry and Felipe Gonzalez. The oranges just get sweeter, the sherry never ceases to get finer but the Socialist Prime Minister is one Andalusian export who may have reached his sell-by date.
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