Arts and Entertainment Face facts: ‘Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World’ with Dr Jago Cooper

When most of us think of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, we think of moai, the 887 magnificent statues that guard its shores. But the mystery of BBC4's Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World wasn't how these monoliths were made, or how they were moved into place (aliens, obviously) or even whether the ancient Rapa Nui people were responsible for their own decline, it's why the myths have persisted for so long.

After (above): A photograph released by the Peruvian Ministry of Culture showing the Archaeological Paradise Complex area where an unidentified group destroyed

5,000-year-old Peruvian pyramid 'demolished by construction companies'

'El Paraiso' was one of the oldest structures in the Americas

What is 'good' porn?

There's been much discussion of the kind of porn that 'should be banned', but if we agree pornography isn't inherently bad, what might this 'good' porn look like?

Aston: 'a great British eccentric... an atheist whose life's work was medieval monasticism' according to his colleague Tony Robinson

Mick Aston: Archaeologist who found television fame on 'Time Team'

Professor Mick Aston was an archaeologist who was part of Time Team, the popular Channel 4 programme which for 20 years brought the world of archaeology to television audiences. Aston acted as chief archaeological adviser for 16 series, from its first broadcast in 1994 through to 2011, and was known for his combination of expertise, passion for the subject, and brightly coloured jumpers.

Mick Aston, Time Team expert, dies aged 66

A former resident academic on Channel 4's popular archaeology show Time Team has died at the age of 66.

This unique Bronze Age dugout canoe from Must Farm, Cambridgeshire is decorated with a criss-cross design - the only such example known in Britain

Dug out canoes found in record haul in Cambridgeshire were Bronze Age Britons' 'run-abouts' of choice, say archaeologists

Ancient Britons made hundreds of thousands of dugout canoes, archaeologists now believe.

Have archaeologists discovered the mysterious lost city of gold, Ciudad Blanca?

Honduras's ancient metropolis ‘found’ using revolutionary 3D mapping technique

Temple of the Feathered Serpent at the archaeological site of Teotihuacan

Hundreds of mysterious yellow orbs discovered under Mexico’s Temple of the Feathered Serpent

Archaeologists excavating beneath Mexico’s Temple of the Feathered Serpent have discovered hundreds of mysterious yellow orbs.

An artist's impression of what the elite lady would have looked like in the grave at the time of the funeral some 4400 years ago

Four-thousand year old gold-adorned skeleton found near Windsor

Archaeologists, excavating near the Royal Borough, have discovered the 4400 year old skeleton of an upper class woman

Timber foundation beams from Roman building, Bloomberg Place

8,000 artefacts and rising: City dig pronounced the 'most important ever' in London

Archaeologists have nicknamed the site 'the Pompeii of the North'

Never mind the hunt for Richard III, what about Boudicca?

The search is on for warrior queen’s bones, once thought to lie beneath a McDonald’s

Unearthed after seven centuries the 'Black Death' pit skeletons that could unravel the medical mysteries of a pandemic

Thirteen skeletons, lying in two neat rows 2.4m beneath a road in Farringdon have been unearthed by excavations for London's Crossrail project

Stretching the breadth of northern England, Hadrian’s Wall is a majestic reminder of the ambition and might of the Roman Empire’s conquest in Britain

So, what did the Romans do for us? New digs reveal truth about Hadrian's Wall

Stretching the breadth of northern England, Hadrian's Wall is a majestic reminder of the ambition and might of the Roman Empire's conquest in Britain. Now, new archaeological evidence has suggested, contrary to previous belief, that the Romans far from co-existing peacefully with the locals, ejected them by force in order to build the 73-mile divide.

Review: Marry Me, By Dan Rhodes

Till ordinary life does us part ...

Children from wealthy homes more likely to be bullied at school, research claims

Children from wealthy homes are more likely to be picked on and bullied at school because of their background, according to new research published today.

Time's Anvil: England, Archaeology and the Imagination, By Richard Morris

From Stonehenge to Birmingham, this survey of the art of the dig modifies our map of the past

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Backhanders, bribery and abuses of power have soared in China as economy surges

Bribery and abuses of power soar in China

The bribery is fuelled by the surge in China's economy but the rules of corruption are subtle and unspoken, finds Evan Osnos, as he learns the dark arts from a master
Commonwealth Games 2014: Highland terriers stole the show at the opening ceremony

Highland terriers steal the show at opening ceremony

Gillian Orr explores why a dog loved by film stars and presidents is finally having its day
German art world rocked as artists use renowned fat sculpture to distil schnapps

Brewing the fat from artwork angers widow of sculptor

Part of Joseph Beuys' 1982 sculpture 'Fettecke' used to distil schnapps
BBC's The Secret History of Our Streets reveals a fascinating window into Britain's past

BBC takes viewers back down memory lane

The Secret History of Our Streets, which returns with three films looking at Scottish streets, is the inverse of Benefits Street - delivering warmth instead of cynicism
Joe, film review: Nicolas Cage delivers an astonishing performance in low budget drama

Nicolas Cage shines in low-budget drama Joe

Cage plays an ex-con in David Gordon Green's independent drama, which has been adapted from a novel by Larry Brown
How to make your own gourmet ice lollies, granitas, slushy cocktails and frozen yoghurt

Make your own ice lollies and frozen yoghurt

Think outside the cool box for this summer's tempting frozen treats
Ford Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time, with sales topping 4.1 million since 1976

Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time

Sales have topped 4.1 million since 1976. To celebrate this milestone, four Independent writers recall their Fiestas with pride
10 best reed diffusers

Heaven scent: 10 best reed diffusers

Keep your rooms smelling summery and fresh with one of these subtle but distinctive home fragrances that’ll last you months
Commonwealth Games 2014: Female boxers set to compete for first time

Female boxers set to compete at Commonwealth Games for first time

There’s no favourites and with no headguards anything could happen
Five things we’ve learned so far about Manchester United under Louis van Gaal

Five things we’ve learned so far about United under Van Gaal

It’s impossible to avoid the impression that the Dutch manager is playing to the gallery a little
Screwing your way to the top? Good for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth

Screwing your way to the top?

Good for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth, says Grace Dent
Will the young Britons fighting in Syria be allowed to return home and resume their lives?

Will Britons fighting in Syria be able to resume their lives?

Tony Blair's Terrorism Act 2006 has made it an offence to take part in military action abroad with a "political, ideological, religious or racial motive"
Beyoncé poses as Rosie the Riveter, the wartime poster girl who became a feminist pin-up

Beyoncé poses as Rosie the Riveter

The wartime poster girl became the ultimate American symbol of female empowerment
The quest to find the perfect pair of earphones: Are custom, 3D printed earbuds the solution?

The quest to find the perfect pair of earphones

Earphones don't fit properly, offer mediocre audio quality and can even be painful. So the quest to design the perfect pair is music to Seth Stevenson's ears
US Army's shooting star: Lt-Col Steven Cole is the man Hollywood calls when it wants to borrow a tank or check a military uniform

Meet the US Army's shooting star

Lt-Col Steven Cole is the man Hollywood calls when it wants to borrow a tank or check a military uniform