Arts and Entertainment Face facts: ‘Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World’ with Dr Jago Cooper

When most of us think of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, we think of moai, the 887 magnificent statues that guard its shores. But the mystery of BBC4's Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World wasn't how these monoliths were made, or how they were moved into place (aliens, obviously) or even whether the ancient Rapa Nui people were responsible for their own decline, it's why the myths have persisted for so long.

After (above): A photograph released by the Peruvian Ministry of Culture showing the Archaeological Paradise Complex area where an unidentified group destroyed

5,000-year-old Peruvian pyramid 'demolished by construction companies'

'El Paraiso' was one of the oldest structures in the Americas

What is 'good' porn?

There's been much discussion of the kind of porn that 'should be banned', but if we agree pornography isn't inherently bad, what might this 'good' porn look like?

Aston: 'a great British eccentric... an atheist whose life's work was medieval monasticism' according to his colleague Tony Robinson

Mick Aston: Archaeologist who found television fame on 'Time Team'

Professor Mick Aston was an archaeologist who was part of Time Team, the popular Channel 4 programme which for 20 years brought the world of archaeology to television audiences. Aston acted as chief archaeological adviser for 16 series, from its first broadcast in 1994 through to 2011, and was known for his combination of expertise, passion for the subject, and brightly coloured jumpers.

Mick Aston, Time Team expert, dies aged 66

A former resident academic on Channel 4's popular archaeology show Time Team has died at the age of 66.

This unique Bronze Age dugout canoe from Must Farm, Cambridgeshire is decorated with a criss-cross design - the only such example known in Britain

Dug out canoes found in record haul in Cambridgeshire were Bronze Age Britons' 'run-abouts' of choice, say archaeologists

Ancient Britons made hundreds of thousands of dugout canoes, archaeologists now believe.

Have archaeologists discovered the mysterious lost city of gold, Ciudad Blanca?

Honduras's ancient metropolis ‘found’ using revolutionary 3D mapping technique

Temple of the Feathered Serpent at the archaeological site of Teotihuacan

Hundreds of mysterious yellow orbs discovered under Mexico’s Temple of the Feathered Serpent

Archaeologists excavating beneath Mexico’s Temple of the Feathered Serpent have discovered hundreds of mysterious yellow orbs.

An artist's impression of what the elite lady would have looked like in the grave at the time of the funeral some 4400 years ago

Four-thousand year old gold-adorned skeleton found near Windsor

Archaeologists, excavating near the Royal Borough, have discovered the 4400 year old skeleton of an upper class woman

Timber foundation beams from Roman building, Bloomberg Place

8,000 artefacts and rising: City dig pronounced the 'most important ever' in London

Archaeologists have nicknamed the site 'the Pompeii of the North'

Never mind the hunt for Richard III, what about Boudicca?

The search is on for warrior queen’s bones, once thought to lie beneath a McDonald’s

Unearthed after seven centuries the 'Black Death' pit skeletons that could unravel the medical mysteries of a pandemic

Thirteen skeletons, lying in two neat rows 2.4m beneath a road in Farringdon have been unearthed by excavations for London's Crossrail project

Stretching the breadth of northern England, Hadrian’s Wall is a majestic reminder of the ambition and might of the Roman Empire’s conquest in Britain

So, what did the Romans do for us? New digs reveal truth about Hadrian's Wall

Stretching the breadth of northern England, Hadrian's Wall is a majestic reminder of the ambition and might of the Roman Empire's conquest in Britain. Now, new archaeological evidence has suggested, contrary to previous belief, that the Romans far from co-existing peacefully with the locals, ejected them by force in order to build the 73-mile divide.

Review: Marry Me, By Dan Rhodes

Till ordinary life does us part ...

Children from wealthy homes more likely to be bullied at school, research claims

Children from wealthy homes are more likely to be picked on and bullied at school because of their background, according to new research published today.

Time's Anvil: England, Archaeology and the Imagination, By Richard Morris

From Stonehenge to Birmingham, this survey of the art of the dig modifies our map of the past

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Homeless Veterans appeal: 'You look for someone who's an inspiration and try to be like them'

Homeless Veterans appeal

In 2010, Sgt Gary Jamieson stepped on an IED in Afghanistan and lost his legs and an arm. He reveals what, and who, helped him to make a remarkable recovery
Could cannabis oil reverse the effects of cancer?

Could cannabis oil reverse effects of cancer?

As a film following six patients receiving the controversial treatment is released, Kate Hilpern uncovers a very slippery issue
The Interview movie review: You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here

The Interview movie review

You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here
Serial mania has propelled podcasts into the cultural mainstream

How podcasts became mainstream

People have consumed gripping armchair investigation Serial with a relish typically reserved for box-set binges
Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up for hipster marketing companies

Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up

Kevin Lee Light, aka "Jesus", is the newest client of creative agency Mother while rival agency Anomaly has launched Sexy Jesus, depicting the Messiah in a series of Athena-style poses
Rosetta space mission voted most important scientific breakthrough of 2014

A memorable year for science – if not for mice

The most important scientific breakthroughs of 2014
Christmas cocktails to make you merry: From eggnog to Brown Betty and Rum Bumpo

Christmas cocktails to make you merry

Mulled wine is an essential seasonal treat. But now drinkers are rediscovering other traditional festive tipples. Angela Clutton raises a glass to Christmas cocktails
5 best activity trackers

Fitness technology: 5 best activity trackers

Up the ante in your regimen and change the habits of a lifetime with this wearable tech
Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Club World Cup kicked into the long grass by the continued farce surrounding Blatter, Garcia, Russia and Qatar
Frank Warren column: 2014 – boxing is back and winning new fans

Frank Warren: Boxing is back and winning new fans

2014 proves it's now one of sport's biggest hitters again
Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton: The power dynamics of the two first families

Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton

Karen Tumulty explores the power dynamics of the two first families
Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley with a hotbed of technology start-ups

Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley

The Swedish capital is home to two of the most popular video games in the world, as well as thousands of technology start-ups worth hundreds of millions of pounds – and it's all happened since 2009
Did Japanese workers really get their symbols mixed up and display Santa on a crucifix?

Crucified Santa: Urban myth refuses to die

The story goes that Japanese store workers created a life-size effigy of a smiling "Father Kurisumasu" attached to a facsimile of Our Lord's final instrument of torture
Jennifer Saunders and Kate Moss join David Walliams on set for TV adaptation of The Boy in the Dress

The Boy in the Dress: On set with the stars

Walliams' story about a boy who goes to school in a dress will be shown this Christmas
La Famille Bélier is being touted as this year's Amelie - so why are many in the deaf community outraged by it?

Deaf community outraged by La Famille Bélier

The new film tells the story of a deaf-mute farming family and is being touted as this year's Amelie