Arts and Entertainment Face facts: ‘Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World’ with Dr Jago Cooper

When most of us think of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, we think of moai, the 887 magnificent statues that guard its shores. But the mystery of BBC4's Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World wasn't how these monoliths were made, or how they were moved into place (aliens, obviously) or even whether the ancient Rapa Nui people were responsible for their own decline, it's why the myths have persisted for so long.

After (above): A photograph released by the Peruvian Ministry of Culture showing the Archaeological Paradise Complex area where an unidentified group destroyed

5,000-year-old Peruvian pyramid 'demolished by construction companies'

'El Paraiso' was one of the oldest structures in the Americas

What is 'good' porn?

There's been much discussion of the kind of porn that 'should be banned', but if we agree pornography isn't inherently bad, what might this 'good' porn look like?

Aston: 'a great British eccentric... an atheist whose life's work was medieval monasticism' according to his colleague Tony Robinson

Mick Aston: Archaeologist who found television fame on 'Time Team'

Professor Mick Aston was an archaeologist who was part of Time Team, the popular Channel 4 programme which for 20 years brought the world of archaeology to television audiences. Aston acted as chief archaeological adviser for 16 series, from its first broadcast in 1994 through to 2011, and was known for his combination of expertise, passion for the subject, and brightly coloured jumpers.

Mick Aston, Time Team expert, dies aged 66

A former resident academic on Channel 4's popular archaeology show Time Team has died at the age of 66.

This unique Bronze Age dugout canoe from Must Farm, Cambridgeshire is decorated with a criss-cross design - the only such example known in Britain

Dug out canoes found in record haul in Cambridgeshire were Bronze Age Britons' 'run-abouts' of choice, say archaeologists

Ancient Britons made hundreds of thousands of dugout canoes, archaeologists now believe.

Have archaeologists discovered the mysterious lost city of gold, Ciudad Blanca?

Honduras's ancient metropolis ‘found’ using revolutionary 3D mapping technique

Temple of the Feathered Serpent at the archaeological site of Teotihuacan

Hundreds of mysterious yellow orbs discovered under Mexico’s Temple of the Feathered Serpent

Archaeologists excavating beneath Mexico’s Temple of the Feathered Serpent have discovered hundreds of mysterious yellow orbs.

An artist's impression of what the elite lady would have looked like in the grave at the time of the funeral some 4400 years ago

Four-thousand year old gold-adorned skeleton found near Windsor

Archaeologists, excavating near the Royal Borough, have discovered the 4400 year old skeleton of an upper class woman

Timber foundation beams from Roman building, Bloomberg Place

8,000 artefacts and rising: City dig pronounced the 'most important ever' in London

Archaeologists have nicknamed the site 'the Pompeii of the North'

Never mind the hunt for Richard III, what about Boudicca?

The search is on for warrior queen’s bones, once thought to lie beneath a McDonald’s

Unearthed after seven centuries the 'Black Death' pit skeletons that could unravel the medical mysteries of a pandemic

Thirteen skeletons, lying in two neat rows 2.4m beneath a road in Farringdon have been unearthed by excavations for London's Crossrail project

Stretching the breadth of northern England, Hadrian’s Wall is a majestic reminder of the ambition and might of the Roman Empire’s conquest in Britain

So, what did the Romans do for us? New digs reveal truth about Hadrian's Wall

Stretching the breadth of northern England, Hadrian's Wall is a majestic reminder of the ambition and might of the Roman Empire's conquest in Britain. Now, new archaeological evidence has suggested, contrary to previous belief, that the Romans far from co-existing peacefully with the locals, ejected them by force in order to build the 73-mile divide.

Review: Marry Me, By Dan Rhodes

Till ordinary life does us part ...

Children from wealthy homes more likely to be bullied at school, research claims

Children from wealthy homes are more likely to be picked on and bullied at school because of their background, according to new research published today.

Time's Anvil: England, Archaeology and the Imagination, By Richard Morris

From Stonehenge to Birmingham, this survey of the art of the dig modifies our map of the past

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Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

Scrambled eggs and LSD

Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

New leading ladies of dance fight back

How female vocalists are now writing their own hits
Mystery of the Ground Zero wedding photo

A shot in the dark

Mystery of the wedding photo from Ground Zero
His life, the universe and everything

His life, the universe and everything

New biography sheds light on comic genius of Douglas Adams
Save us from small screen superheroes

Save us from small screen superheroes

Shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D are little more than marketing tools
Reach for the skies

Reach for the skies

From pools to football pitches, rooftop living is looking up
These are the 12 best hotel spas in the UK

12 best hotel spas in the UK

Some hotels go all out on facilities; others stand out for the sheer quality of treatments
These Iranian-controlled Shia militias used to specialise in killing American soldiers. Now they are fighting Isis, backed up by US airstrikes

Widespread fear of Isis is producing strange bedfellows

Iranian-controlled Shia militias that used to kill American soldiers are now fighting Isis, helped by US airstrikes
Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Shoppers don't come to Topshop for the unique
How to make a Lego masterpiece

How to make a Lego masterpiece

Toy breaks out of the nursery and heads for the gallery
Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Urbanites are cursed with an acronym pointing to Employed but No Disposable Income or Savings
Paisley’s decision to make peace with IRA enemies might remind the Arabs of Sadat

Ian Paisley’s decision to make peace with his IRA enemies

His Save Ulster from Sodomy campaign would surely have been supported by many a Sunni imam