Arts and Entertainment Face facts: ‘Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World’ with Dr Jago Cooper

When most of us think of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, we think of moai, the 887 magnificent statues that guard its shores. But the mystery of BBC4's Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World wasn't how these monoliths were made, or how they were moved into place (aliens, obviously) or even whether the ancient Rapa Nui people were responsible for their own decline, it's why the myths have persisted for so long.

Suarez confronts Evra in the match between Liverpool and Manchester United

Luis Suarez racism hearing underway

The Football Association have today begun the disciplinary hearing into claims that Liverpool striker Luis Suarez racially abused Manchester United defender Patrice Evra.

Fabulous Christmas gift ideas: Stockists

The art of giving

Rizwan Syed: Does racialised media harm multiculturalism?

The recent riots have demonstrated that, contrary to Thatcher’s sentiments, society does exist.

Northern humans have bigger brains

People from northern parts of the world have evolved bigger eyes and brains with more developed visual processing to help them to cope with long winters and grey skies, a study has suggested.

Blood Rites, By Barbara Ehrenreich

From prey to predator – why we wage war

Does Cameron have multiculturalist ambitions?

The nature of what David Cameron was arguing in his speech in Munich is problematic. He claims some young Muslim men ‘find it hard to identify with Britain... because we have allowed the weakening of our collective identity’.

Book Of A Lifetime: The Interpretation of Cultures, By Clifford Geertz

If you mapped out a novelist's history in books, beloved and influential fictions would have to loom large in the foreground. But books of ideas can be significant in a novelist's formation too - history or science or philosophy or whatever, depending on taste and training and accidental encounter. From those books we derive the framework of our beliefs, the underpinning convictions thatform our mindset and play through and around the witnessing, empathetic, dreaming parts of our perception. And these shaping beliefs will always be at work in the stories we write, however obliquely, or at whatever level of conscious or unconscious deployment.

Ten of the bloodiest bedtime stories

Remember the cosy nights of your childhood tucked up in bed as mummy or daddy read you softly to sleep?

Family Album, By Penelope Lively

Penelope Lively's story of the Allersmead family – Allersmead is the house, not their name, but they are so identified with the house that they never need a surname – is told by its various members, including Swedish au pair Ingrid, who came one day and never left.

Beeswax (NC)

Andrew Bujalski's low-key, low-budget Austin-set drama is strangely engaging.

Evidence of mass cannibalism uncovered in Germany

Evidence of mass cannibalism in which even children and unborn babies were on the menu has been uncovered in Germany by archaeologists.

Leading article: An anthropologist for our age

When Claude Lévi-Strauss was feted on his 100th birthday last year, the surprise for many was that he was still alive. The surprise on his death, 11 months later, is that, despite becoming the first centenarian among France's immortels, his days had been numbered after all.

Father of anthropology dies aged 100

Claude Levi-Strauss, widely considered the father of modern anthropology for work that included theories about the similarities between tribal and industrial societies, has died aged 100.

Paperback: Pies and Prejudice, by Stuart Maconie

In a week when a generation was utterly mortified at being called "middle class", this affectionate and philosophical look at northerners, "plastics" and deracinated peoples from above the Watford Gap is a timely look at the structure of modern Britain. Maconie aims his anthropological travelogue at people who can go out in October without a coat on, cheer at motorway signs to "The North" and still remember a £2 pint, but also at their southern softie cousins. His chapters about the glorious north are more enjoyable than the one on the grim south, but his search for his northern soul has just the right balance of pies and prejudice to be right good.

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Netherlands' goalkeeper Tim Krul fails to make a save from Costa Rica's midfielder Celso Borges during a penalty shoot-out in the quarter-final between Netherlands and Costa Rica during the 2014 FIFA World Cup
newsGoalkeepers suffer from 'gambler’s fallacy' during shoot-outs
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Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmReview: A week late, Secret Cinema arrives as interactive screening goes Back to the Future
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Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
artCultural relations between Sydney and Melbourne soured by row over milk crate art instillation
Arts and Entertainment
Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux play teeneage lovers in the French erotic drama 'Blue Is The Warmest Colour' - The survey found four times as many women admitting to same-sex experiences than 20 years ago
filmBlue Is The Warmest Colour, Bojack Horseman and Hobbit on the way
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Preparations begin for Edinburgh Festival 2014
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Two giraffes pictured on Garsfontein Road, Centurion, South Africa.
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View from the Llanberis Track to the mountain lake Llyn
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environmentA large chunk of Mount Snowdon, in north Wales, is up for sale
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices