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The arts and intoxication have gone hand-in-jittery-hand for centuries – so perhaps it's no surprise how many stars are making their own booze.

Where the camera lies

Sophie Campbell looks between the frames of `Evita' for the real Argentina. Or is that Hungary?

Why can't women be more like men, and enjoy failing

You know you live in a man's world when rapists and paedophiles are released into the community without being cured, when women are offered a mere pounds 10,000 for abortions performed on them against their will, when single mothers are blamed for everything, when women (perhaps only in Hollywood) consider it necessary to get their labia surgically plumped, when single women eat better than married ones, when female mountain climbers are castigated for being poor parents but male balloonists are applauded for deserting their weeping children and when men risk their lives for nothing but only pregnant women are accused of having small brains.

THE shortlist

10 EVITA OUTFITTERS

Out of body experience

Alberto Manguel follows the progress of an undiplomatic corpse; Santa Evita by Toms Eloy Martnez, Doubleday, pounds 15.99

After 'Evita', Peron to face dirt-diggers

Madonna's latest starring role means that the international spotlight is once more focused on Evita Peron. Now Evita's husband, Argentina's populist leader General Juan Peron, is also being disinterred.

FILM : Desperately seeking the exit

DOROTHY PARKER, on a tour of William Randolph Hearst's gaudy mansion San Simeon, noticed an image of the Blessed Virgin Mary above the door to his mistress's bedroom, and was moved to verse satire. Lightly adapted, Mrs Parker's tart lines slide quite snugly over the film the publicists (if no one else) have termed the Movie Event Of The Year, Alan Parker's Evita (PG): "Upon my honour / I saw Madonna / Occupy the niche / Of that crashing bore / The high- class whore / Of the world's worst son of a bitch." And she occupies it gracefully, all things considered. Madonna's performance - adequate acting, more than adequate singing, nimble footwork - is among the very best things in a film which, for all one's advance misgivings, isn't altogether contemptible. Apart from the music and lyrics, that is. They're tripe.

In bed with Evita

Evita: Alan Parker (PG)

The stuff of fantasy

First it was Jane Austen adaptations, now it's `Evita' - how small and large screens put ideas into designers' heads.

`Evita' puts spotlight on creative feud

A very English coolness between two knights of the realm could put a cloud on the Hollywood glitz of the film premiere of the year, when Evita opens in London tomorrow.

POP : Ezio Borderline, London

Sometimes, in a back-handed sort of way, you think there really may be hope for Britain. For example, wandering down Charing Cross Road last Friday, you might have wondered who could possibly be playing the Borderline. One of London's least appetising venues, this hell-hole had a queue stretching practically to Waterloo. To see? Ezio. C'mon - obscure twosome from Cambridge; play songs of lamentation, dreams and desire on a couple of acoustics; debut LP Black Boots on Latin Feet out a year ago, good reviews, sank without trace, though it probably gets played to death at dinner parties around Islington's Canonbury Square. Further clue for stragglers: Sue Lawley.

calling all latin lovers ...

Latin Fever is coursing through the nation's veins, writes Cayte Williams. No sooner had the Flamenco dancer Joaquin Cortes stomped and scowled his way back to Spain when Tango Por Dos, an Argentine Tango outfit, arrived in the West End (see The Critics, page 13). Tomorrow, the Spanish menswear label Armand Basi will be launched in London and, as if that wasn't enough, the long-awaited Evita, starring the latin aficionado Madonna and the ultimate latin lover, Antonio Banderas, opens in December.

You had to laugh, really

When apartheid fell, it was time for Pieter-Dirk Uys, South Africa's Dame Edna, to come up with a new act.

Spanish set for life after Gonzalez Socialists

ELIZABETH NASH

FILM: Spike, up to a point

SPIKE LEE's Clockers (18) represents a new departure for the director, if not a new dawn. The films that made Lee's controversial name (Do the Right Thing, Jungle Fever) had the deceptive feel of cinematic parables - deceptive because Lee had carefully complicated the expected morals. Shot in blazing, luminous colours, these films revelled in bright clashes of opposing views. By contrast, Clockers is a murkier beast altogether, prowling over a grey area of morality, and challenging the viewer to make out a moral in the gloom. Gone are the carefully intertwined dialectical choices - protest or silence, race or love, Malcolm or Martin. Replacing them, some would say for the first time in Lee's work, is the real world.
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Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

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From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

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Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

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