News

The arts and intoxication have gone hand-in-jittery-hand for centuries – so perhaps it's no surprise how many stars are making their own booze.

Where the camera lies

Sophie Campbell looks between the frames of `Evita' for the real Argentina. Or is that Hungary?

Why can't women be more like men, and enjoy failing

You know you live in a man's world when rapists and paedophiles are released into the community without being cured, when women are offered a mere pounds 10,000 for abortions performed on them against their will, when single mothers are blamed for everything, when women (perhaps only in Hollywood) consider it necessary to get their labia surgically plumped, when single women eat better than married ones, when female mountain climbers are castigated for being poor parents but male balloonists are applauded for deserting their weeping children and when men risk their lives for nothing but only pregnant women are accused of having small brains.

THE shortlist

10 EVITA OUTFITTERS

Out of body experience

Alberto Manguel follows the progress of an undiplomatic corpse; Santa Evita by Toms Eloy Martnez, Doubleday, pounds 15.99

After 'Evita', Peron to face dirt-diggers

Madonna's latest starring role means that the international spotlight is once more focused on Evita Peron. Now Evita's husband, Argentina's populist leader General Juan Peron, is also being disinterred.

FILM : Desperately seeking the exit

DOROTHY PARKER, on a tour of William Randolph Hearst's gaudy mansion San Simeon, noticed an image of the Blessed Virgin Mary above the door to his mistress's bedroom, and was moved to verse satire. Lightly adapted, Mrs Parker's tart lines slide quite snugly over the film the publicists (if no one else) have termed the Movie Event Of The Year, Alan Parker's Evita (PG): "Upon my honour / I saw Madonna / Occupy the niche / Of that crashing bore / The high- class whore / Of the world's worst son of a bitch." And she occupies it gracefully, all things considered. Madonna's performance - adequate acting, more than adequate singing, nimble footwork - is among the very best things in a film which, for all one's advance misgivings, isn't altogether contemptible. Apart from the music and lyrics, that is. They're tripe.

In bed with Evita

Evita: Alan Parker (PG)

The stuff of fantasy

First it was Jane Austen adaptations, now it's `Evita' - how small and large screens put ideas into designers' heads.

`Evita' puts spotlight on creative feud

A very English coolness between two knights of the realm could put a cloud on the Hollywood glitz of the film premiere of the year, when Evita opens in London tomorrow.

POP : Ezio Borderline, London

Sometimes, in a back-handed sort of way, you think there really may be hope for Britain. For example, wandering down Charing Cross Road last Friday, you might have wondered who could possibly be playing the Borderline. One of London's least appetising venues, this hell-hole had a queue stretching practically to Waterloo. To see? Ezio. C'mon - obscure twosome from Cambridge; play songs of lamentation, dreams and desire on a couple of acoustics; debut LP Black Boots on Latin Feet out a year ago, good reviews, sank without trace, though it probably gets played to death at dinner parties around Islington's Canonbury Square. Further clue for stragglers: Sue Lawley.

calling all latin lovers ...

Latin Fever is coursing through the nation's veins, writes Cayte Williams. No sooner had the Flamenco dancer Joaquin Cortes stomped and scowled his way back to Spain when Tango Por Dos, an Argentine Tango outfit, arrived in the West End (see The Critics, page 13). Tomorrow, the Spanish menswear label Armand Basi will be launched in London and, as if that wasn't enough, the long-awaited Evita, starring the latin aficionado Madonna and the ultimate latin lover, Antonio Banderas, opens in December.

You had to laugh, really

When apartheid fell, it was time for Pieter-Dirk Uys, South Africa's Dame Edna, to come up with a new act.

Spanish set for life after Gonzalez Socialists

ELIZABETH NASH

FILM: Spike, up to a point

SPIKE LEE's Clockers (18) represents a new departure for the director, if not a new dawn. The films that made Lee's controversial name (Do the Right Thing, Jungle Fever) had the deceptive feel of cinematic parables - deceptive because Lee had carefully complicated the expected morals. Shot in blazing, luminous colours, these films revelled in bright clashes of opposing views. By contrast, Clockers is a murkier beast altogether, prowling over a grey area of morality, and challenging the viewer to make out a moral in the gloom. Gone are the carefully intertwined dialectical choices - protest or silence, race or love, Malcolm or Martin. Replacing them, some would say for the first time in Lee's work, is the real world.
News
peopleHowards' Way actress, and former mistress of Jeffrey Archer, was 60
Sport
Romelu Lukaku puts pen to paper
sport
News
Robyn Lawley
people
Arts and Entertainment
Unhappy days: Resistance spy turned Nobel prize winner Samuel Beckett
books
News
people
Life and Style
Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson voice the show’s heroes
gamingOnce stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover
News
i100
Life and Style
Phones will be able to monitor your health, from blood pressure to heart rate, and even book a doctor’s appointment for you
techCould our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?
News
people
Extras
indybest
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices
Could our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?

Could smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases?

Health Kit and Google Fit have been described as "the beginning of a health revolution"
Ryanair has turned on the 'charm offensive' but can we learn to love the cut-price carrier again?

Can we learn to love Ryanair again?

Four recent travellers give their verdicts on the carrier's improved customer service
Billionaire founder of Spanx launches range of jeans that offers

Spanx launches range of jeans

The jeans come in two styles, multiple cuts and three washes and will go on sale in the UK in October
10 best over-ear headphones

Aural pleasure: 10 best over-ear headphones

Listen to your favourite tracks with this selection, offering everything from lambskin earmuffs to stainless steel
Commonwealth Games 2014: David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end

Commonwealth Games

David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end
UCI Mountain Bike World Cup 2014: Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings

UCI Mountain Bike World Cup

Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star