Reviews

  • Review

Santigold, Electric Brixton, review

Since her last full-length album, 2012’s Master of My Make-Believe, Santigold (Santi White) has spent her time contributing to the soundtracks for Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Paper Towns as well as having a baby, trying out acting and launching her own makeup collection.

  • Review

Laura Marling, Queen Elizabeth Hall, gig review

Guy Garvey, Elbow frontman and curator of this year’s Meltdown festival at London’s Southbank Centre, calls Marling “the Big Friendly Giant of British music”. The Nu-folk singer songwriter closes the event this evening with an authoritative, full-hearted and honest performance.

  • Review

Werther, Royal Opera House, review

Published in 1774, Goethe’s epistolary novel The Sorrows of Young Werther was the bestseller of its day, and its plot couldn’t be simpler: Werther loves Charlotte who is betrothed to Albert, and although Werther’s love is requited, duty binds Charlotte, so he shoots himself. The novel spawned an industry of related merchandise, and provoked copycat suicides; Massenet’s operatic take goes all-out for lachrymosity, and demands two great voices to create its effects.

  • Review

Tristan and Isolde, English National Opera, review

Much buzz surrounded the opening night Tristan and Isolde directed by the ENO’s incoming artistic director, the irrepressibly optimistic 39-year-old American Daniel Kramer, taking over at a time of great turbulence. It’s not his first production for the company, following Birtwistle’s Punch and Judy in 2009 and a Josef Fritzl-imbued Duke Bluebeard’s Castle which was topical, but a very particular take on Bartòk’s vision. Broadly speaking, his treatment of Wagner’s hymn to the apotheosis of love is a success.  

  • Review

Marissa Nadler gig review

In the two years since 2014’s lugubrious, autobiographical July, Marissa Nadler returns to London with songs from her new album Strangers