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The arts and intoxication have gone hand-in-jittery-hand for centuries – so perhaps it's no surprise how many stars are making their own booze.

Love, sex, intelligence

Victoria Abril is playful, unafraid, impervious; an emblematic actress for post-Franco Spain. John Lyttle shared a sofa

A high-class fairytale in New York

A LITTLE PRINCESS Alfonso Cuaron (U) DESPERADO Robert Rodriguez (18) THE HARVEST David Marconi (no cert) LOCH NESS John Henderson (PG) JOHNNY MNEMONIC Robert Longo (15) RENDEZ-VOUS IN PARIS Eric Rohmer (PG)

Madonna cries for 'Evita'

Madonna, controversially starring in the film version of the musical Evita, has begged Argentines not to disrupt planned shooting today, writes Phil Davison.

Evita and Madonna

Argentina is deeply split over the portrayal of an idol by a material girl. Elizabeth Nash reports

The 'Evita' industry As seen by Mrs Briggs, 330 times

Evita premiered in the Prince Edward Theatre in 21 June 1978, starring Elaine Paige. The role of Eva Peron was later played by Marti Webb and then Stephanie Lawrence. The show ran for 2,913 performances.

Come back Blofeld, all is forgiven

also showing; POCAHONTAS Mike Gabriel/ Eric Goldberg (U) THE NET Irwin Winkler (12) ASSASSINS Richard Donner (15) MY FAMILY Gregory Nava (15) LE BALLON D'OR Cheik Doukoure (PG)

Crime pays

Crime has really arrived. Hollywood's lengthy tradition of film noir, of course, was raided by the cine-semioticians long ago, and has been "art" for decades. But guardians of literature have been keen for longer to keep crime in its genre ghetto. Fast-wind to 1995, however, and it seems that the most trenchant analysis of social and cultural mores is being done by the crime novel, with the rise to respectability of such popular authors as James Ellroy, Elmore Leonard and Michael Dibdin. So the fifth year of Britain's only crime and mystery festival, Shots in the Dark, which coincides with Bouchercon, the world mystery convention for book-lovers, looks set to be its most successful yet. Shots kicks off with Desperado (8pm 21 Sept), a high-budget Tex-Mex action thriller with the two-fold attraction of Antonio Banderas and lots of guns, and also has screenings of Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead (8.30pm 23 Sept), a gangster movie which stars the dream team of Andy Garcia, Christopher Lloyd and Christopher Walken, and J'ai pas Sommeil (8.15pm 30 Sept), the new true-story Gallic noir starring Beatrice Dalle; and closes with Mute Witness (8.30pm 1 Oct), a Moscow-shot British thriller, starring Mary Sudina (left). What's more, there are collections of early British thrillers by Hitchcock. On the literary side, Bouchercon includes signings by the likes of James Ellroy and Ruth Rendell, as well as a conversation with Morse writer Colin Dexter. As they say, steal a ticket.

POP MUSIC / Centrefold: Freak Show: Almodovars droogs turn out in force for Kika bash

When Billy Bragg guested on The Late Show to review Pedro Almodvar's High Heels, the Red Wedger got hot under his blue collar over the movie's 'non-consensual sex. He should catch Kika, Almodvar's latest fruity schlock-shocker opening on Friday. Despite (or because of) being slammed, bammed and thank-you-ma'amed by critics who took umbrage with its frivolous treatment of rape, it's soaked up dollars 300,000 over three weeks in Spain. Until Kika, the precocious director (right) was pet urchin of the critical fraternity. Pauline Kael described him as 'the most original pop writer-director of the Eighties. . . Godard with a human face - a happy face, and indeed, he has the look of a latino teddy-bear, golf-ball eyes popping from a Yorkshire- pudding face. He also introduced Antonio Banderas to the world, and to Madonna, at the Fellini-esque party he threw for the Vogueing One.

FILM / Right of Reply

I FEEL obliged to respond to some of the criticism directed at the motion picture Philadelphia, so the world can return its attentions to less pressing matters, like the civil war in Bosnia.

FILM / Appearances can be deceptive: Aids has played its part in Hollywood movies before now, but only in heavy disguise. Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia may pretend to confront the issue but, argues John Lyttle, not much has changed

Watching Jonathan Demme's Aids drama Philadelphia is like watching a master magician doing tricks from inside a strait-jacket. He can do more impressive things, but he's constrained by circumstance.

ROCK / Sinead sings Evita

WHAT DO you do when you're an international star who can't get a hit, and a tabloid demon in the Scargill and Gaddafi class, and the time comes for that famously difficult third album? Well, if you're Sinead O'Connor, you sign up producer Phil Ramone and a 47-piece orchestra, and wrap your contentious larynx around a sackful of standards, previously made famous by a gamut of legendary women singers; from Julie London to Alison Moyet, via Ella Fitzgerald and Elaine Paige (well, Julie Covington did 'Don't Cry For Me Argentina' first, but I suppose Paige's name was more likely to cause outrage).
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003