Arts and Entertainment Face facts: ‘Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World’ with Dr Jago Cooper

When most of us think of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, we think of moai, the 887 magnificent statues that guard its shores. But the mystery of BBC4's Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World wasn't how these monoliths were made, or how they were moved into place (aliens, obviously) or even whether the ancient Rapa Nui people were responsible for their own decline, it's why the myths have persisted for so long.

CIVILWAR DIG: This print of

Civil war battle rises from the ruins of Old Fredericksburg

Perhaps the Yankee boys from Company C had tumbled into the basement on Princess Anne Street to escape the rebel snipers hidden in the ruined buildings outside.

Stone Age home found

Archaeologists have unearthed the ruins of one of Britain's oldest homes during construction work in a field north-west of Edinburgh. The remains are thought to be more than 10,000 years old. They were found during archaeological excavation works in preparation for building the Forth Replacement Crossing, a new bridge across the Firth of Forth.

Man responsible for making Titanic seaworthy had request for 50% more lifeboats knocked back, new documents reveal

Private papers from the man responsible for making sure the Titanic was safe to sail have emerged that show he demanded 50% more lifeboats but was pressurised by the White Star Line into backing down.

Postcard from... Italy

Italy is the land of the automobile and whether it's parking on pavements or adopting the national driving philosophy of “Why brake when you can swerve?”, locals give most of their best performances on four wheels. It has emerged that a particularly contentious manoeuvre or “inchino” (little bow) took place during the Targa Florio car rally in Sicily last month, when participants were allowed to drive by – and into – one of Italy's most celebrated archaeological sites, the Greek theatre in Syracuse.

A portrait of Richard the III, King of England 1452-1485

Skeleton in Richard III hunt may be friary founder

A second skeleton found by archaeologists searching for the remains of King Richard III could be that of a friary's female founder.

Debate about the Neanderthals' fate has raged for decades

Neanderthals vs. Humans: Who would win in a fight?

We've had Alien vs. Predator, Monsters vs. Aliens and Dracula vs. Frankenstein, but what would happen if modern man and his prehistoric ancestor were to square off?

Tony Robinson, presenter of 'Time Team'

Can you dig it? not if you're a 'Time Team' fan

Well, I hope my old Anglo Saxon studies tutor is happy. I remember that in more than one of his lectures he reared up to his full height (considerable, given the worn leather bush hat he used to sport) to rant about the TV show Time Team.

6,000 sites on historic danger list

A 100-year-old cinema in Devon, a Margate roller coaster and Britain's first atomic bomb store, in Thetford Heath, Suffolk, are among the historic sites at risk of being lost for future generations, warns English Heritage.

Burial site of ancient warrior queen found in Guatemala

Known as Lady Snake Lord to her pals and Kaloomte, or "supreme warrior" to her subjects, Lady K'abel ruled the Wak kingdom in present day Guatemala between AD 672 and 692.

Tania Kovats, Artist

In the Studio: Tania Kovats, Artist

'I don't have an impulse to make work that looks like my work'

Egyptology takes you back thousands of years to explore an ancient civilisation - their texts, temples, and monuments. This is the Great Sphinx of Tanis, at the Louvre Museum in Paris

What's it like to study... Egyptology

Just over a decade ago, Gemma Smith decided she was going to be "the next Evelyn O’Connell". She has since graduated from Swansea University with a first class honours degree in Egyptology, and is about to start her MA in Ancient Egyptian Culture.

Archaeologists begin dig to uncover grave of Richard III in Leicester

The son of a descendant of Richard III's eldest sister was on site today as what is believed to be the first ever search for the lost grave of an anointed King of England began in a city centre car park.

HMS Victory, the 1737 predecessor to Nelson’s flagship, was lost with all hands in 1744 in the English Channel. Armed with 100 bronze cannon, it was found in 2008, damaged by trawlers and still at risk

Scientist warns trawler damage to shipwrecks will result in an archaeological catastrophe

International action is urgently required to save the world's imperilled historic shipwrecks from the ravages of commercial fishing, experts have warned.

HMS Victory, the 1737 predecessor to Nelson’s flagship, was lost with all hands in 1744 in the English Channel. Armed with 100 bronze cannon, it was found in 2008, damaged by trawlers and still at risk

You're wrecking our wrecks! Experts warn of damage trawlers are doing to maritime history

Archaeologists want sunken vessels to be given the same levels of protection as threatened marine ecosystems

Lives Remembered: Brian Dobson, Archaeologist and noted authority on Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrian's Wall is not an easy monument to interpret. Its very size suggests that its sole purpose was defence, but study of the archaeological remains leads to a more subtle view in which frontier control and the mobility of the Roman army in the whole of the frontier zone played a part.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project