Aretha Franklin

Album: The Black Keys, Brothers, (V2)

The Black Keys, it seems, are currently everyone's favourite blue-eyed blues band, occupying the spot previously occupied by The White Stripes, until Jack White dived into prog-rock and Goth diversification with The Raconteurs and The Dead Weather respectively. And unlike most white boys trespassing on blues territory, this duo even seem to have won over the hearts of their black peers – which is just as well, since few young black Americans appear inclined to pursue the blues path themselves. Damon Dash picked them to provide the grooves over which his hip-hop chums rapped for the Blakroc project, on which Pharoahe Monche and RZA conceded, in a textbook back-handed compliment, "fuck the white boys, The Black Keys got so much soul."

The celebrations: Man of the hour walks among his faithful followers

He didn't shake any hands, was surrounded by dozens of secret service agents, and only left his new heated Cadillac for a few minutes. But Barack Obama's first walkabout as US President succeeded in warming-up a crowd which had been shivering on Capitol Hill since well before dawn.

The pop star: VV Brown

On paper, 24-year-old VV Brown certainly has the makings of a star – beauty, a big voice and, crucially, the backing of a major record label. Add to that her penchant for retro-soul and success on a huge scale seems a foregone conclusion.

Pervis Jackson: Detroit Spinners bass vocalist

The fine art of blending vocals in a group is one that was beautifully exemplified by the line-up of the Detroit Spinners. The group's foundation was the bass singing of Pervis Jackson, to which was added Henry Fambrough's baritone and the tenor voices of Bobbie Smith and Billy Henderson. These four were the group's mainstays, but additional fifth members who came and went included Philippe Wynne, whose distinctive falsetto and high tenor graced several hits between 1972 and 1977.