Sport Charlie Mulgrew admits the Celtic squad are not thinking about breaking any records despite 23-match unbeaten run

Mulgrew was on target as Celtic thumped Kilmarnock to edge closer to another Scottish Premiership title

Turnberry course to be lengthened for Open

Turnberry's Ailsa course will be 247 yards longer for this year's British Open than it was the last time it staged the event in 1994.

Man charged with killing mother and daughter

A man has been charged with the murders of a woman and her 10-year-old daughter after their bodies were discovered at the side of a road. Diane Fallon, 43, and her daughter Holly disappeared from their home in the village of Cronberry, near Cumnock in East Ayrshire, 13 days ago.

The Bard, By Robert Crawford<br />A Night Out with Robert Burns, Ed. Andrew O'Hagan

Robert Burns is an exceptional poet, unique in popularity, unique in voice. His work has never been out of print since his first collection, Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, was published in 1786 (when he was 27), and is cherished, as Robert Crawford points out, far beyond Scotland and Europe. Burns is also the most vernacular of the printed poets, certainly of those occupying the EngLit canon. Even today, in an era of performance poetry, with several brilliant Scots writers working in that genre, it's difficult to think of anyone who articulates their politics and passions on the page with such immediacy. It's a truism that great literature is grounded in the voice, but literary transmission changes that voice: it goes underground and emerges as style. Rarely is voice so utterly audible as it is in Burns – as we read him, it's as if we heard him speaking.

The Bard, By Robert Crawford

Scotland's national icon is revealed as a complex and disturbing figure in this new biography

Leading article: Sentimental journey

Has there ever been a more airy dismissal of a literary giant? According to the BBC television presenter Jeremy Paxman, Robert Burns, the national poet of Scotland, is merely "a king of sentimental doggerel".

The Atlantic Ocean, by Andrew O'Hagan

Storm warnings for this leaky union

British Energy sale deal nears

Nuclear power firm British Energy is set to be sold for more than £12 billion next week, according to reports today.

Freddie Williams dies aged 65

The bookmaker Freddie Williams, famous in betting circles for taking on JP McManus at the Cheltenham Festival, has died at his home in Ayrshire at the age of 65. He suffered a heart attack after working at Ayr races on Saturday afternoon and a Glasgow greyhound stadium that night.

British Energy profits hit by shutdowns at its ageing nuclear plants

The fragility of British Energy's ageing fleet of nuclear reactors, producer of a sixth of the nation's energy, has been pushed back to the top of the public agenda after a second reactor in as many days shut down unexpectedly.

Tommy McQuater: Illustrious jazz trumpeter

The most illustrious of British trumpeters, Tommy McQuater became famous in the Thirties and remained one of the great characters of jazz into his nineties. He began playing the trumpet at school and didn't stop for 80 years.

Castles: Taking on the ultimate doer-upper

It could be one of Britain's finest houses. For now, it's a crumbling ruin &ndash; but the Government will help fund its restoration. Helen Brown hits the high roads with a specialist castle dealer as he looks for a buyer with a sense of adventure

Defence officials block wind farms

The Ministry of Defence have been accused of shooting down Gordon Brown's plans for tackling global warming by opposing wind farms across Britain.

Miles Kington: Why Americans in Paris flock to Sank Roo Doe Noo

I was shown a menu from California which had subtitles so that Americans could pronounce the dishes. 'Ron yon' for 'rognon', that sort of thing

Woman wins £1m over food poisoning

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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project