News

At least 17 migrants from Haiti died on Wednesday when their overloaded sailboat capsized as it was being towed to shore in the Turks and Caicos Islands, officials in the British territory said.

Lawyers battle to save lives of killers

LAWYERS for two convicted murderers due to be executed today in the Bahamas were last night still desperately seeking last minute reprieves for the men, after all legal avenues had apparently been exhausted.

Lawyers fight to halt hanging

LAWYERS for two convicted murderers due to be executed today in the Bahamas were desperately seeking reprieves for the men last night after all legal avenues had apparently been exhausted.

Paradise murder man in court

A TEENAGER was due in court today accused of murdering the British schoolteacher Joanne Clarke at an exclusive Caribbean holiday resort. The 18-year-old local man has confessed to killing Miss Clarke and American Lori Fogleman, 32, whose body was found nearby on Paradise Island in the Bahamas, according to police.

Nose to nose with a hungry shark

Deborah Keeping spent a week diving with sharks in the Bahamas. Now she won't hear a word against them

Gunmen rob the Yard's top cop

THE SENIOR BRITISH police officer sent to the Bahamas last week to investigate the murder 10 days ago of British tourist Joanna Clarke was himself held up at gunpoint while visiting an island beauty spot, it emerged yesterday.

Murdered tourist victim of sex attack

JOANNE CLARKE, a British teacher murdered in the Bahamas last weekend, had been sexually assaulted and strangled, an American forensic expert said yesterday after an autopsy.

Wish you were here? Perhaps not

Over three thousand Britons have died while travelling abroad since 1994. When foul play is involved, their families can face massive indifference from the authorities if they try to find the culprits. No one wants trouble in a tourist paradise

The killer lurking in Paradise

PARADISE ISLAND in the Bahamas merits the marketing hyperbole. It has white sand beaches as soft as icing sugar, fringed with gently swaying palm trees. Its warm seas are a dazzling azure. The seafood is fresh and plentiful, and the rum is cheap.

Briton's body discovered in Bahamas

THE BODY of a British woman missing on holiday in the Bahamas has been found beside that of another woman. Both appear to have been strangled.

Soros slams drug war as $17bn flop

Clinton and Blair will tell the UN they are beating the narcotics trade. The facts don't bear them out, writes Phil Davison

Fishing lines; There was only one Onesimus

MRS USTONSON was determined that her newly born would make his mark in life. So when the vicar dipped her squalling youngster into the fount and asked for his name, she said firmly: "Onesimus".

Cuban exile lays down law on US entry

A Cuban baseball star who was given special clearance to enter the United States after escaping to the Bahamas is refusing to take up the offer until his fellow passengers are also allowed into the US.

Arts: Tomorrow Never Dies, And Nor Does 007 Bond

After 35 years of active service, most people would retire. But James Bond is about to take on his 18th mission. Jasper Rees raises a glass to his health, while David Thomson would rather he received a bullet all the villians who tried to fire a bullet

Column One: Things ain't so dandy for this tough old cowboy

The kids of today. Having goaded the once liberal Jack Straw into raging about child curfews and juvenile tagging, they have now driven poor old Desperate Dan into retirement.

Theatre review: You, too, might fall for the queen of tarts

The fasination in watching HRH, Snoo Wilson's new play about the dubious activities of Edward and Mrs Simpson during their wartime spell in the Bahamas, lies in the constant shifts in our sympathies. We succumb to the batty charm of an upper- class twit and his savvy American beauty only to recoil from the ghastliness of what they have to say. We're glamoured by the insider gossip (being king, Edward tells us, is a "bloody boring job"), titillated by details of Wallis' sexual adventures, and then chilled by the selfishness, snobbishness and anti-semitism (not to mention the friendship with Hitler). It's love 'em and loathe 'em.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine