Ben Stiller

I can't see the funny side of Zoolander 2

The sequel to the 2001 comedy satire starring Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson as simple-minded, aesthetically obsessed male models takes slapstick swipes at the fashion industry

The Week In Radio: Yes, there's something about Mary Whitehouse

I rather liked Mary Whitehouse. She would often ring me up in a previous journalistic incarnation to "draw my attention" to upcoming outrages. And when she did she was always polite, intelligent and firm, like the girls' school teacher she once was. If the tide of filth had already been broadcast, she would read out the profanities, "eight bloodys, two buggers and a Christ", in her special, taking-the-register monotone, which always enlivened a dull day. And while her repressive views on homosexuality and pre-marital sex were deeply unappealing, her biggest impact on broadcasting was not about sex at all. It was establishing the idea that listeners and viewers should have a say in what broadcasters provide.

Generation X: A mid-life crisis

They were the so-called slackers who didn't feel compelled to grow up. Now, with middle age a sobering reality, are their years of underachieving beginning to hit home?

DVD: Tropic Thunder, Rental & Retail, (Paramount)

Ben Stiller, Robert Downey Jr and Jack Black star as three has-beens who think they're filming a Vietnam war epic in the jungle, unaware that the people who keep shooting at them aren't actors playing the Viet Cong, they're genuine trigger-happy guerrillas.

DVD: Tropic Thunder (15)

Tropic Thunder, Ben Stiller's Vietnam-film-within-a-film, has a lot of gags to get through in its two-hour running time – the self-regard of actors; the greed and ruthlessness of Hollywood producers; a raft of 'Nam movie clichés – and yet it still seems at least 20 minutes too long, with all the best jokes used up in the first act (including a terrific trio of spoof trailers).

George Carlin: Seven words that shook a nation

America in the 1970s wasn't ready for George Carlin: his meditation on the morality of swearing led to arrest, prosecution – and even a Supreme Court judgment. Andy McSmith pays tribute