Voices

The wise knew the demise would be slow. Bill Gates gave newspapers another 50 years

Nerds of the cyberstocracy

There may be something oddly prophetic in Douglas Coupland's novel Microserfs, writes Jon Courtenay Grimwood

Throw away the Times and win

Today the Times transforms itself into Britain's biggest freesheet. The newspaper is being given away as part of a marketing campaign by Microsoft, the American software company.

Wall Street in the grip of techno-frenzy

Netscape is going to be the Microsoft of the Internet - or so investors hope.

Leading Article: Keeping up with the barons

Free countries should be fractious places. Newspapers, television channels, magazines, electronic information services are there to amplify the arguments - in short, to cause more trouble. This newspaper was founded precisely because the great media warlords of print and screen cause too little trouble in the bear garden of ideas.

Struggling to put a brain to a face

review

Inmarsat joins race to build first global satellite mobile phone system

THE RACE to build the first global pocket satellite telephone system intensified yesterday when Inmarsat, the London-based consortium, unveiled plans for the first stage of development, writes Russell Hotten.

Home is where the office is

IT IS estimated that anywhere between one and four million people in Britain work at home, and - with the rail strike likely to accelerate the trend - the numbers are rising.

City & Business: Bizarre options

PETER KINDERSLEY is an influential publisher and a very rich man. As a book designer in the 1970s he helped produce the seminal bedside manual, The Joy of Sex, before going on to found his own publishing company, Dorling Kindersley. Apart from the occasional hiccup, DK has prospered, producing a raft of distinctively designed reference books. Bill Gates of Microsoft was impressed enough to take a 20 per cent stake in the company, and the two sides are busy converting books on to interactive CDs.

Wealthiest 120 in US worth total of dollars 251bn

AMERICA'S 120 billionaires are worth a combined total of dollars 251bn. Should they choose they could balance the books for the Federal government, which is expected to run a fiscal 1994 deficit of dollars 225bn.

YORK ON ADS / No 21: Apple

APPLE IS making its pitch for the world of multimedia and information super-highways. It's getting there via the sensibility of the moderately hip thirtysomething - ie, The World of Jonathan Ross.

Pembroke: Wedded bliss

BILL GATES, 37-year-old head of the software giant Microsoft, has no fears that his forthcoming nuptials will hamper his business drive. Mr Gates, who is the richest man in the US and has been dubbed 'The Nerd', told a gathering of Britain's business leaders: 'I've been trying to tell people - it takes a lot of time being single. I think being married will be very efficient.' Romantic, huh?

BOOK REVIEW / Brainy nerds with a greedy passion for chips: 'Accidental Empires' - Robert X Cringely: Viking, 16.99 pounds

THE AUTHOR of this boisterous history of chips and keyboards reckons that the personal computer industry, which in 1990 recorded sales of pounds 70bn, is the fourth-biggest business in the world, behind cars, energy and, of course, illegal drugs. That's not bad for a gadget only 15 years old. But Robert X Cringely resists the temptation to write pious hymns to the wild energy and far-sightedness of the brainy Californians who introduced us to the special pleasures of staring at a small screen, wondering what the hell's going on in there. On the contrary, he is here, he says, to point out three things:

BOOK REVIEW / Follow the nerd instinct and make a billion: Hard Drive: James Wallace & Jim Erickson - John Wiley & Sons pounds 14.95

BILL GATES is an ugly sort of chap. At 36 going on 19, spots, dandruff and checked sports shirts are still high on the agenda, while personal hygiene and grooming come somewhat lower. If your daughter brought him home, you'd probably take her aside and ask her what she was doing with such a nerd.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices