News Toronto Mayor Rob Ford holds a Rob Ford bobblehead doll at Toronto city hall

Scandal-hit Toronto Mayor to run for re-election despite crackgate

Today's the day the teddy bears have their Last Supper

Mark Banks wipes the final specks of cement off his latest creation, a portrayal in stained glass of the Last Supper in which Jesus and the Disciples are represented as bears.

Marley's unknown legend that could sell for pounds 60m

Previously unreleased tracks by the late reggae singer, Bob Marley, have been put up for sale for pounds 60m by his former producer.

Rock: Be nice with our feathery friends

Rock `n' Roll has always been about attitude, angst and anomie: upper lip curled in a sneer, shoulders hunched in leather-jacketed rebellion. We know that Counting Crows' lead singer, Adam Duritz, had the requisite wild childhood, and so seems ideally placed to look back in anger. But no. This is rock'n'roll with attitude - a really nice, really friendly attitude.

Ready to Wear: Come on you dreads

Dreadlocks are coils of uncut hair, originally worn by Rastafarians and generally associated with black people. But, over the past 10 years, this has become an increasingly fashionable way to wear your hair if you're white. Unless you have incredibly curly hair, Caucasians will have to visit a sympathetic hairdresser to obtain the desired effect. And not all hairdressers will do this, as they say it is not the healthiest thing to do to your hair - although London salon Antenna will perm your hair into dreads! Otherwise, you can do it yourself - use lots of finger twisting to tease your hair, add beeswax and then leave. Once done, dreadlocks are easy to keep and can be washed like any other style - but throw away your combs and brushes, you'll have to cut these little beauties off if you no longer require the look. Over the past few weeks, I have been hanging around the streets of London with a photographer in search of people with dreads. Oddly, we came across only men sporting this particular style. Zoe Brown

Break from tradition; MUSIC

In bed with his leg in plaster, Tricky tells Ben Thompson why he won't do what's expected of him

New improved Yazz

The club queen who sang 'The Only Way Is Up', then completely disappeared, is back. Gone are the disco whites and peroxide crop. In is a new sound and a radically new hair-do.

Jamaicans 'go white' in the painful pursuit of success

With A Rasta Barbie doll on sale for the first time this Christmas, one might well think black pride's work was finally done. The growing popularity of an altogether different product in Jamaica tells another tale.

Gossip or news? Who can tell?

What makes a front page story is changing - for the worse

School for sandcastles

Charlotte Packer meets professional sand-sculptor Paul Hoggard

If Sir Teddy Taylor is elected to No 10, the walls will thump to the bass of Bob Marley

A publicity event took place the other day. That is, it wasn't actually an event at all, just a moment when the encompassing vapour of PR briefly coalesced into a visible nebula. And the visibility wasn't a by-product of some larger energy, it was the sole point. A large record store had decided to celebrate its birthday by commissioning a survey into the musical tastes of Britain's MPs, thus combining their own commercial desire for a name check with the incontinent eagerness of politicians to give out their opinions. And, whatever your feelings about the fact that 101 MPs have nothing better to do with their time than fill in questionnaires about their musical taste, the resulting document was irresistible.

Pop: Great covers 12/ The Upsetters: `Super Ape'

In 1976 it was possible to hear Super Ape coming to get you through the undergrowth. This was Island Records' second front on the nascent British (for which read white) roots reggae market, consolidating Bob Marley's recent breakthrough into pop celebrity. Ape declared itself with heavy footfall, the woosh of uprooting trees, the repeat-echo of distant hyenas gnashing their teeth. Fashionable white people shivered deliciously. This was the "dread" sound of dub riddim, and thanks to Island, you could now buy Lee "The Upsetter" Perry's Black Ark records in Woolworths. Well, Boots.

$6m judgment upheld on Marley estate

$6m judgment upheld on Marley estate

Pop: Ben Harper; Jazz Cafe, London

Hyperbole is no stranger to the popular music industry, at least that branch of it given over to descriptions of the latest performers - but in Ben Harper, breathless expressions of adulation may have finally found a suitable home. Now aged 25 and with two albums under the belt of his combat fatigues, the Californian singer/ songwriter is something of a rare bird: a virtuoso slide guitarist who blends blues and protest songs with a presence and a vocal range that belie his tender years.

Wild winds of change worry Bermudians

Phil Davison in Hamilton says Hurricane Felix may do more than disrupt the independence poll

pop; riffs

Roy Harper on Leopold Stokowski's Symphonic Synthesis of Parsifal
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Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before