News Toronto Mayor Rob Ford holds a Rob Ford bobblehead doll at Toronto city hall

Scandal-hit Toronto Mayor to run for re-election despite crackgate

Today's the day the teddy bears have their Last Supper

Mark Banks wipes the final specks of cement off his latest creation, a portrayal in stained glass of the Last Supper in which Jesus and the Disciples are represented as bears.

Marley's unknown legend that could sell for pounds 60m

Previously unreleased tracks by the late reggae singer, Bob Marley, have been put up for sale for pounds 60m by his former producer.

Rock: Be nice with our feathery friends

Rock `n' Roll has always been about attitude, angst and anomie: upper lip curled in a sneer, shoulders hunched in leather-jacketed rebellion. We know that Counting Crows' lead singer, Adam Duritz, had the requisite wild childhood, and so seems ideally placed to look back in anger. But no. This is rock'n'roll with attitude - a really nice, really friendly attitude.

Ready to Wear: Come on you dreads

Dreadlocks are coils of uncut hair, originally worn by Rastafarians and generally associated with black people. But, over the past 10 years, this has become an increasingly fashionable way to wear your hair if you're white. Unless you have incredibly curly hair, Caucasians will have to visit a sympathetic hairdresser to obtain the desired effect. And not all hairdressers will do this, as they say it is not the healthiest thing to do to your hair - although London salon Antenna will perm your hair into dreads! Otherwise, you can do it yourself - use lots of finger twisting to tease your hair, add beeswax and then leave. Once done, dreadlocks are easy to keep and can be washed like any other style - but throw away your combs and brushes, you'll have to cut these little beauties off if you no longer require the look. Over the past few weeks, I have been hanging around the streets of London with a photographer in search of people with dreads. Oddly, we came across only men sporting this particular style. Zoe Brown

Break from tradition; MUSIC

In bed with his leg in plaster, Tricky tells Ben Thompson why he won't do what's expected of him

New improved Yazz

The club queen who sang 'The Only Way Is Up', then completely disappeared, is back. Gone are the disco whites and peroxide crop. In is a new sound and a radically new hair-do.

Jamaicans 'go white' in the painful pursuit of success

With A Rasta Barbie doll on sale for the first time this Christmas, one might well think black pride's work was finally done. The growing popularity of an altogether different product in Jamaica tells another tale.

Gossip or news? Who can tell?

What makes a front page story is changing - for the worse

School for sandcastles

Charlotte Packer meets professional sand-sculptor Paul Hoggard

If Sir Teddy Taylor is elected to No 10, the walls will thump to the bass of Bob Marley

A publicity event took place the other day. That is, it wasn't actually an event at all, just a moment when the encompassing vapour of PR briefly coalesced into a visible nebula. And the visibility wasn't a by-product of some larger energy, it was the sole point. A large record store had decided to celebrate its birthday by commissioning a survey into the musical tastes of Britain's MPs, thus combining their own commercial desire for a name check with the incontinent eagerness of politicians to give out their opinions. And, whatever your feelings about the fact that 101 MPs have nothing better to do with their time than fill in questionnaires about their musical taste, the resulting document was irresistible.

Pop: Great covers 12/ The Upsetters: `Super Ape'

In 1976 it was possible to hear Super Ape coming to get you through the undergrowth. This was Island Records' second front on the nascent British (for which read white) roots reggae market, consolidating Bob Marley's recent breakthrough into pop celebrity. Ape declared itself with heavy footfall, the woosh of uprooting trees, the repeat-echo of distant hyenas gnashing their teeth. Fashionable white people shivered deliciously. This was the "dread" sound of dub riddim, and thanks to Island, you could now buy Lee "The Upsetter" Perry's Black Ark records in Woolworths. Well, Boots.

$6m judgment upheld on Marley estate

$6m judgment upheld on Marley estate

Pop: Ben Harper; Jazz Cafe, London

Hyperbole is no stranger to the popular music industry, at least that branch of it given over to descriptions of the latest performers - but in Ben Harper, breathless expressions of adulation may have finally found a suitable home. Now aged 25 and with two albums under the belt of his combat fatigues, the Californian singer/ songwriter is something of a rare bird: a virtuoso slide guitarist who blends blues and protest songs with a presence and a vocal range that belie his tender years.

Wild winds of change worry Bermudians

Phil Davison in Hamilton says Hurricane Felix may do more than disrupt the independence poll

pop; riffs

Roy Harper on Leopold Stokowski's Symphonic Synthesis of Parsifal
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones