News Toronto Mayor Rob Ford holds a Rob Ford bobblehead doll at Toronto city hall

Scandal-hit Toronto Mayor to run for re-election despite crackgate

Deeply moving, standing still

Rock

Good vibes for Badass follow on

In the wake of Channel 4's Badass TV, BBC2 offers another Friday night show dedicated to afro-centric culture. The Vibe (11.15pm) is a weekly quiz that tests contestants knowledge of Black music. Eight teams of three contestants will attempt to answer questions on soul, ragga, rap, jungle, reggae, gospel and jazz.

Stanley Spencer's The Resurrection, Cookham has been given a face- lift and a whole new lease of life by a school on the Isle of Dogs

When in 1923 Stanley Spencer painted his famous work The Resurrection, Cookham, he can little have suspected that it would one day be used to educate East End teenagers. Spencer presents a surreal view of his local parish church, in which the dead, wrapped in winding sheets, rise uncorrupted from the grave to greet the living on the pleasant summer's afternoon of the day of resurrection.

Token tourist Yusuke Tadaki in London

Age: 22

Soul meets the abstract space

Annie Lennox's new album is a set of covers. Here she introduces them; below, Tim de Lisle reviews them

The ultimate career move?: Early deaths have given the music business a constant run of lucrative anniversaries. Next month it's Marvin Gaye's 10th. Next year it will be Jimi and Janis's 25th. Be prepared with our selective guide to the living dead

ROCK DEATHS seem so dated, so Seventies, now. The vultures may have circled when Nirvana singer Kurt Cobain collapsed in Italy a few weeks ago, but they went away hungry. The excitement generated by the rumour, however - some American radio stations rushed to announce his 'death' - emphasised just how rare this kind of scare has become. River Phoenix may have supplied his generation in Hollywood with their own James Dean, but most of today's big rock stars have planned their futures too wisely to consider overdosing in a plush hotel room as a smart career move. Dangerous excess is either a phase they've 'recovered' from (Eric Clapton) or one they've apparently never considered (Madonna: too healthy). And the survivors - Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan, Keith Richards - seem to be getting the last laugh over the idea that premature death is the supreme myth-maker. Even middling rock stars, such as Aerosmith, can receive huge contracts (in 1991 they got dollars 25m to stay with Sony) and expanding sales well into middle age, thanks to the kind of global marketing Jim Morrison never had.

Live music? I can't stand the sight of it

FOR SEVERAL thousand years, nobody paid much attention to the live band at gigs. The Plato Experience, the Rockin' Togas, the Hey Nonny No Band, Jake and his Jacobeans, Gus and his Augustans, and every other combo throughout history were just there to provide the sounds; nobody wanted to watch them, just to dance to them. What, after all, was there to watch?

People: McCartney makes his peace with Yoko

CONFIRMING a musical reunion of the three surviving Beatles, Paul McCartney inducted John Lennon into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame on Wednesday night. 'For old time's sake, we're going to give it a whirl,' he said.

Past and future leaders party into the new dawn

JOHANNESBURG - The song 'I'm not in love' did not seem the most appropriate to celebrate the dawn of the new South Africa, writes John Carlin.

FEATIVALS / What's so great about the great outdoors?: Glastonbury, soul at Ally Pally, Jazz on a Summer's Day - last weekend, music took to the open air. Our reviewers breathed deeply

The second summer of grunge. The boys had their baggy shorts on, the girls their drop-waist floral prints, and both sexes sported more pairs of army boots than are seen at manoeuvres on Salisbury Plain. But there was barely a fuzz-box riff or a wheedling slacker lyric in the air. The punters may have all looked the same, but the music at Glastonbury catered for many tastes: crusty white dub (Back to the Planet), squeaky clean soul (Jamiroquai), camp pop (Suede), even drab pub rock (the Kinks). And apart from the pub rock, it was great.

ROCK / The rhythm that changed the world: Catching a fire, all over again: Richard Williams on the collected Bob Marley

THE SWEET SMOKE hung like thick velvet curtains in Harry J's studio on the hot, wet night I got taken to hear the Wailers cutting the tracks for Catch a Fire, the album that changed the face of Jamaican music, of black music, of popular music irrespective of race, creed or colour. But it wasn't just the smoke. Here, in the sombre, floating harmonies of 'Slave Driver', in the hypnotic unnhh-chakka unnhh-chakka rhythm of 'Concrete Jungle', was something so new and so amazing that you'd have to have been completely unconscious to have missed its implications. As the half-dozen musicians rolled out the warm, elastic grooves way past the length needed for any conceivable record release, the minutes and the hours seemed to exchange values.

ROCK / RIFFS: Roots, rock, reggae: Bob Marley double: Michael Franti of the Disposable Heroes on 'Zimbabwe' and UB40's Jim Brown on 'Stir It Up'

AFTER THE riots in LA I started picking up on Bob Marley a lot, mainly because of his ability to put the political and the personal on the same track - something that's really missing today.
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