Brad Pitt

Watch the entire history of the planet in under two minutes

Curious about the history of our planet, but quite busy today? Internet artists melodysheep have the solution. They've edited together various pieces of footage and some lovely music to create a visualisation of the entire history of our planet in under two minutes.

Mystery man: Key collaborators on Terrence Malick's latest film

Terrence Malick is the invisible filmmaker. He never gives interviews and refuses to have his picture taken. Inevitably, this has created an air of mystery around him. There is a suspicion that he must be a Stanley Kubrick-like recluse: an eccentric visionary with strange foibles. However, speak to key collaborators on his most recent film, The Tree of Life (which won the Palme d'Or in Cannes and is released in the UK tomorrow), and what is immediately apparent is the affection in which he is held, and the eagerness that top technicians and actors all have to work with him.

Film: Cannes Report

Cheerful and entertaining, joyful and uplifting – this year's Riviera jamboree has not dazzled, but it has delivered a rare crop of inventive cinema in which the story shines

How to survive a horror movie

If you want to survive a horror film or a crime movie, there are some basic rules: avoid sex and bathrooms – and never, ever, do 'one last job', says Ben Walsh

Self-mutilation on film - What a carve-up!

In 127 Hours, a climber hacks his arm off with a knife. Strong stuff? Yes, but it's only the latest entry in cinema's rich history of self-mutilation, argues Kaleem Aftab

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Inglourious Basterds (18)

A while ago, Bryan Ferry put his elegantly shod hoof in his mouth by commenting approvingly that the Nazis “knew how to put themselves in the limelight and present themselves”. Now Quentin Tarantino has managed to find something about the Nazis that he too can relate to: some of them could talk the hind legs off a donkey.

Quentin Tarantino: What's it like being on set with Hollywood's most

Inglourious Basterds ticks all the boxes for a film by Quentin Tarantino. Visceral violence, an inspired soundtrack, genre bent all out of shape, reams of crackling dialogue and a veritable love letter to Sergio Leone, The Dirty Dozen and the films of pre-war Germany? Check. But an award-winning performance? Now that's unusual. Samuel L Jackson as the Bible-spouting hitman in Pulp Fiction, and Robert Forster as the ageing bail bondsman in Jackie Brown, both received Best Supporting Actor nominations at the Oscars. But in general, Tarantino films don't receive their plaudits for their performances.

Back to the Führer at the movies

SS zombies? Hitler in drag? The Nazis are again being used as all-purpose villains by a slew of film-makers. Only this time, argues Geoffrey Macnab, they're not to be taken seriously