News The CCTV headquarters in Beijing

Worldwide arm set to co-operate on at least two major natural history projects with CCTV9's documentary arm

Red (12A)

Starring: Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren

Endangered award: The science book prize

Business is booming in the sector, so why are its annual awards under threat? Steve Connor reports

Brian Cox: 'If they pay me a lot of money, I'll do the film, and if they don't, I won't'

Brian Cox is both Hollywood's favourite rent-a-baddie and a titan of the stage. Pretty good for a man who considers himself 'little me from Dundee'

Leading article: Royal relief

Inherently outdated as the honours system might be, there is something about the latest Queen's list of birthday gongs which rather effectively captures the national zeitgeist.

Simon Carr: 'You want to throw the cat at Brooke'

First Sight

Hannibal actor Brian Cox to play Speaker of the House of Commons in expenses drama

Brian Cox, the actor best known for his roles as Hannibal Lecter and the corrupt CIA boss in two of the Bourne movies, was today lined up to play former House of Commons Speaker Michael Martin.

Brian Cox: We're doing it not because it's easy, but because it's hard

The Large Hadron Collider is all about understanding the forces of nature, and it’s on this understanding that our modern technological world rest. You can trace a direct line through the history of physics, from Newton’s gravity, Faraday and Maxwell’s electronmagnetism, Rutherford’s discovery of the atomic nucleus, Eddington’s understanding of the power source of the Sun, and on to the LHC. Everything we take for granted today, from modern medical technology to mobile phones, is possible because we understand how the forces of nature work.

DVD: Trick ’R Treat (15)

As Hallowe'en approaches, Warner Home Video has released the seasonal tie-in in the hope a few unsuspecting souls may be tricked into buying it.

Lolita, National Theatre: Lyttleton, London

Brian Cox was the first actor to portray Hannibal Lecter, in the movie Manhunter. He now plays another sociopath with fancy affectations as Humbert Humbert, the middle-aged émigré who conducts an abusive affair with his 12-year-old step-daughter in Nabokov's 1955 novel Lolita. There have been many earlier adaptations. Here it's filleted by Richard Nelson to create a one-man show – potentially the truest method. Narrated by Humbert in mesmerising first-person prose, the book compels and repulses as a dramatic monologue: an obsessive's warped apologia pro vita sua.

Teen rape victim's 'brave' radio admission

A child protection group says a girl who revealed on radio she was raped should be praised for breaking "the silence on child sexual assault".

Shirley Dent: 'Are you just being weird now?’

Watch this youtube video fully comprehend the sheer and utter frustration which drove Brian Cox, research fellow of the Royal Society and professor of particle physics at the University of Manchester, to ask this question of a gormless TV producer.

Estate agent: 'My father was the Zodiac Killer'

Deborah Perez says that she was fooled into helping 1960s serial murderer who terrorised San Francisco and fascinated Hollywood

Unfair competition stifling independent films, says Brian Cox

'Best work' goes unseen while giant blockbusters thrive

Professor Brian Cox: English scholar, poet and editor of 'Critical Quarterly' whose Black Papers sparked debate on education

Brian Cox was a gifted teacher, a superb editor, a skilled administrator and a considerable poet. In another life he might have been a vice-chancellor or perhaps a junior minister for education. However his commitment to the teaching of English, both reading and writing, meant that much of his working life was devoted to raising the standard of debate about education in general and the teaching of English in particular.

Voices
voicesGood for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth, writes Grace Dent
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The University of California study monitored the reaction of 36 dogs
sciencePets' range of emotions revealed
Life and Style
fashion Designs are part of feminist art project by a British student
Arts and Entertainment
The nomination of 'The Wake' by Paul Kingsnorth has caused a stir
books
Arts and Entertainment
The Tour de France peloton rides over a bridge on the Grinton Moor, Yorkshire, earlier this month
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Snoop Dogg pictured at The Hollywood Reporter Nominees' Night in February, 2013
people... says Snoop Dogg
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i100
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Residents of Derby Road in Southampton oppose filming of Channel 4 documentary Immigration Street in their community
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voicesSiobhan Norton on why she eventually changed her mind
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
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Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn