News A red bellied piranha, similar to the palometas that have injured bathers in attacks in Argentina

The fish already injured swimmers cooling down from the heat last month

On The Road: A forgotten corner of Argentina

As the dust whips up around the station, a bus from the 1950s pulls in and slams open its doors. I squeeze in next to a rather large and not very accommodating woman; the door of the bus closes with a sound similar to a dying bird. I immediately smell chickens, dust, and ham sandwiches.

24-Hour Room Service - Home Hotel, Buenos Aires, Argentina

There's no place like Home. Or rather there wasn't in 2002 when Argentine PR Patricia O'Shea and her British record -producer husband, Tom Rixton, were planning their wedding in Buenos Aires. As their guests jetted in from around the world, they realised that there was a boutique hotel-sized gap in the market. So with some additional funding from U2's record producer, Flood, and Crowded House bass player Nick Seymour, they decided to create the kind of place they would like to stay themselves.

Making the move to Latin America

Argentina offers a cheaper cost of living, stunning scenery and rising house prices, says Aoife O'Riordan

Gap Year: Stay put and explore the culture

Perhaps the hardest part of taking a gap year is choosing where to go and what to do. The range of projects on offer is overwhelming. Many people overcome this by booking round-the-world tickets and trying to go everywhere and do everything. It's now common for a gapper to jump from South Africa to Thailand to Australia to Buenos Aires and pass through LA before returning home, having covered six continents in six months.

Holocaust-denying bishop 'on way to UK'

A British-born Roman Catholic bishop asked to leave Argentina after "offensive" comments about the Holocaust is reportedly on his way back to Britain.

DVD: The Wong Kar-Wai Collection (15)

An assembly of three cinematic masterpieces – Ashes of Time, Happy Together and Chungking Express – by the acclaimed Hong Kong film-maker.

48 Hours In: Buenos Aires

For tango, midnight dining and bargain prices, you can do no better than to soak up the southern summer in Argentina's beautiful capital

The Shah? He's as safe as houses ...

... that was the startling misjudgement made by the British ambassador on the eve of Iran's Islamic revolution. This and other extraordinary stories are revealed in secret documents released yesterday by the National Archives. Cahal Milmo reports

Something To Declare: Olympic London; Buenos Aires; Baggage fees

Where to go, how to save, what to avoid

The Ministry of Special Cases, By Nathan Englander

Nathan Englander's sober, precisely-written novel has a flavour of Kafka about it, but it is no fantasy. It begins almost lightheartedly, focusing on the Argentinian Jewish stonemason Kaddish, and his strange employment of erasing from headstones the names of ancestors that respectable Jews are ashamed of. Then his son, Patos, goes missing, and Kaddish and his wife, Lillian, in opposed and equally hopeless ways, attempt to trace him.

Argentina's 'Loony Radio' threatened by hospital closure

With no front teeth, Pacotillo is an unlikely radio sensation. And his patter with members of his on-air posse sounds more like a group therapy session than a Saturday show. But then the broadcast is coming from the inside of a Buenos Aires psychiatric hospital. And it is called La Colifata or "Loony Radio".

Alberto Manguel: The spirit of the shelves

From Argentina to Canada to France, Alberto Manguel crossed a planet of stories, a world champion of books. He tells Boyd Tonkin how he finally found his place

Farmers give Argentina's President first major crisis

Cristina Fernandez, the former Argentinian First Lady turned president, is on a collision course with her country's all-important big farmers, provoking strikes, food shortages and clashes in the streets of Buenos Aires barely three months after she first took office from her husband, Nestor Kirchner.

The Travel Issue: Buenos Aires in July

I'm reliably informed that people visit Buenos Aires for reasons other than tango. Granted, it's quite a city, full of crumbling grandeur – and the resting place of one rather famous First Lady. But to me, as one of the more recent members of the international tango tribe, and to many others, the Argentinian capital is simply where a most extraordinary dance-form was born. And as such, it's the Mecca for any tango-minded European. In fact, you're not a dancer till you've spent some time here. Two weeks is a nanosecond – and won't qualify me for any tango street cred – but at least I got my first taster.

Mauresmo feels the home fire

Imagine the pressure Tim Henman has been under in recent years to deliver for Britain at Wimbledon. Double that, and you have some idea what French players, men and women, face as they tread the tomato-coloured clay of Roland Garros in search of glory for the homeland.

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Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
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The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
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Life and Style
Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
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Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
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Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
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An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
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Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
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Buyers of secondhand cars are searching out shades last seen in cop show ‘The Sweeney’
motoringFlares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own