News Actress Emily Rossum enjoyed the free healthcare she got in the UK

'I would get hurt just to get that for free,' says impressed host

Stars shine for a theatre tribute to charming Tinker

The London Palladium was packed yesterday as the theatre industry paid tribute to the famous Daily Mail critic, Jack Tinker, who died last year.

Rave reviews that can lead to death notice

Carmen may be not be quite a musical, and according to many critics the current production at the Royal Albert Hall is not quite an opera. The reviews last week described it as "cheapskate", "low-grade" and "third- rate - a disgrace".

Letter: We luv Dickie

I was surprised at the claims that "students are unhappy with Cameron Mackintosh's pounds 1.5m drama professorship" ("No ovations for Oxford's luvvies", 2 February). All the more so since the article coincides with the end of Lord Richard Attenborough's tenure. He put more into the professorship than any student or benefactor could have hoped for. His year overlapped with the making of In Love and War and he gave 20 students the chance to become involved in the film, with location visits, lectures and workshops. Lord Attenborough is a truly great teacher. Both he and Cameron Mackintosh deserve great thanks.

Skeletons in the cupboard

Who needs a budget of millions to re-create Ray Harryhausen's special effects on stage, when you can have two blokes and a pipe? James Rampton reports on a tribute to the master of stop-frame

A company man

Stephen Sondheim won't do interviews. Or present radio programmes. So what's this? Speaking on Radio 2 on Tuesday and talking to Edward Seckerson from his New York home? It'll never happen

City panned by their critics

Manchester City 0 Huddersfield Town 0

Theatre: Proof that money can't buy you love

The old version of Martin Guerre centred on a man, Arnaud, who returns from war to the village where his friend Martin had lived, meets Martin's wife, moves in with her, secretly becomes a Protestant in a Catholic community (like his wife), and fathers her child, who will become the heir to the land the Catholics want to retain. Then Martin returns. Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg, the musical team that brought us Les Miserables and Miss Saigon, used this story to tell us - somewhat in the style of a Benetton ad - that we are all imposters, religion equals bigotry and love is better than hate. Most people lost the plot but got the message.

The musicals to see first

His name is synonymous with the West End musical, but last night Cameron Mackintosh faced his biggest test

Maestro with Midas touch faces toughest challenge yet

His name is synonymous with the West End musical, but last night Cameron Mackintosh faced his biggest test

Martin Guerre comes back fighting

The ill-fated musical Martin Guerre is to close. But four days later it is to reopen with a radically altered first act.

Theatre Martin Guerre Prince Edward, London

"Tell me, who are the impostors here?" sings the priest in the new Boublil / Schoenberg musical.

The shows must go on, and on...

Cameron Mackintosh can't sing, dance or play an instrument, but he sure knows how to put on a musical. Georgina Brown meets the great impresario the week 'Martin Guerre' opens in the West End

Wet blanket for Mackintosh

Artspeople

'Saigon' in the wars over lack of misses

The West End stage musical Miss Saigon has encountered a crisis because the management cannot find any young oriental children for the show, writes David Lister.

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