News The logo of Samsung Electronics is displayed on a glass door at their headquarters in Seoul on November 6, 2013. Samsung Electronics promised better shareholder returns, dismissed fears over smartphone market saturation and signalled a more aggressive acquisitions policy Wednesday at a rare analysts' briefing to boost its flagging stock price.

Samsung has announced plans to open 60 of its own branded stores in Britain and six other European countries, in a bid to challenge Apple's successful retail store approach.

Questions Of Cash: 'I'm not getting anywhere with my Carphone Warehouse complaint'

Q. I have been in contact with Carphone Warehouse (CW) since July regarding problems with my new mobile phone. I raised this as an official complain on 9 September, but I have hit a brick wall. CW says it can't resolve my complaint because of the Data Protection Act. It has asked for personal information from me that I am not willing to divulge as I do not believe its email system is secure. To make matters worse, emails to CW are either returned as undelivered, or go into a long queue. I have been without a phone for six weeks while the company tries to repair it, during which time I have paid for a phone that I do not have and which has not been in proper working order for four months. I purchased a Samsung I8510 on an 18-month contract in December 2008. NS, Edinburgh.

Electricals giant Best Buy to create 8,000 UK jobs and open 80 stores

The world's largest electricals retailer, Best Buy, is to create 8,000 jobs in the UK over the next five years and is gearing up to open its first stores this coming spring, taking on Currys and Comet.

Phorm cuts losses as it faces down criticism of 'big brother' technology

Phorm, the controversial behavioural advertising IT company, shook off the disappointment of failing to land a string of UK contracts by slashing its losses 40 per cent, and saying it has a "strong future" in its home market.

Win tickets to Richard Nicoll's show at London Fashion Week

Be in with a chance of winning a pair of tickets to the designer's show at LFW, plus one of his limited-edition pouches and a BlackBerry Curve 8520 smartphone

Questions Of Cash: 'Lloyds ignored my calls after I was a victim of fraud'

Q. In September last year, someone strolled into the Highgate Village branch of Lloyds TSB and withdrew £2,400 in cash from our account, using only a driving licence as identification. They also conducted some transfers between accounts, using my cash ISA allowance. On the following Monday I was called by Willesden Green branch to ask where I was and was I withdrawing more cash. Lloyds TSB repaid the money into my account promptly. I asked for a copy of the fake driving licence to see if it had my own identification number. I was called by someone telling me that all proper procedures had been followed. I didn't believe him. My letters and phone calls have since gone unanswered. The Financial Ombudsman Service told me it is not concerned with lousy service, only with financial loss. Eventually, Lloyds admitted it hadn't taken a copy of the driving licence. It added that even if it had it could not give it to me on data protection grounds as, by definition, it was not about me! Lloyds offered me £40 for a new driving licence, but I want the bank to promise to train staff to prevent it happening again. SA, Twickenham.

Virgin Media losses narrow as customers spend more

Losses narrowed at Virgin Media as customers spent at record levels demonstrating the strength of the pay TV model over free-to-air counterparts in the downturn, but it failed to match the growth seen by rival BSkyB.

Oman team moves into unassailable lead

The unstoppable force which is the Oman sailing team in the iShares Cup was again winning applause from the crowds thronging the shoreline today.

Cowes Week opens with dismal day in Solent

The Scottish call it dreich, others murky, damp and dismal, and the Solent was at its megadreich for the opening day of Cowes Week.

Questions Of Cash: Tiscali get their wires crossed in phone line blunder

Q. Two years ago, I bought a flat for my son. We wanted to use Tiscali as an internet provider, but could only do this if we had a BT line installed. BT installed the line and sent me the bills. Then, in March, BT wrote to me regretting that I was leaving them. My son and I knew nothing about this. We spoke to BT, which said the instruction had come from another provider, but the staff did not know which. I was asked, for the legal record, whether I wished to leave BT and I said no. In April, the phone line was cut off. I spoke to BT, which told me to speak to the new provider – but I didn't have a new provider! I transferred to another BT operative, who said she could set up my number again. A couple of days later, my son rang his number to be told that it was a Tiscali answering service. I phoned Tiscali and the operative said there were two addresses attached to the phone number: one was ours, the other belonged to someone else entirely. She said there had clearly been a billing error, but that I would need to speak to the accounts department to resolve this. When I spoke to them, I was told the Data Protection Act prevented any information being given to me as my name was not on the account. I asked to speak to a supervisor, but this was also refused on data protection grounds. I spoke to BT again, which said my number could be recovered the following month. But the next day BT phoned to say it could not give us the line back as Tiscali refused to release the number as it was not attached to my name. KR, Surrey.

£100m black hole discovered in 2012 Olympics accounts

A £100m black hole in the 2012 Olympics accounts of the London Development Agency (LDA) is to be investigated by independent auditors, it was revealed last night.

Carphone looks to demerge next summer

Carphone Warehouse said it would spin off its TalkTalk broadband business by July 2010 at the latest yesterday as it reported results after a "significant year of achievement".

Free laptops as Tesco takes on Carphone

Tesco is going head to head with Carphone Warehouse, offering free laptops to customers who take out many of its mobile broadband packages.

Market Report: Heady times forecast for Enterprise Inns

Enterprise Inns strengthened last night, rising by almost 4 per cent, or 6p, to 158.75p after Credit Suisse said the stock had room to trade higher, despite having more than tripled in value since early March.

Martin Dawes seeks a hat-trick with sale of TV rental chain

Martin Dawes, the serial entrepreneur, has hoisted the for-sale sign over his eponymous TV rental and electrical equipment business, which could bring to an end his family's more than 40-year involvement in the industry.

Big Yellow raises £33m from placing

Big Yellow Group, the storage specialist, has raised £32.9m in a share placing to fund its expansion over the next five years, as it swung to a £71.5m loss affected by a fall in the valuation of its store estate.

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