Life and Style

The UK Council for Child Internet Safety will draw up a list of approved sites offering advice about topics such as sex and drugs

Google opposed to government proposals to introduce filters blocking internet pornography

Google has said it is opposed to government proposals to introduce filters blocking internet pornography because they will amount to censorship and risk encouraging lazy parenting online.

New Bill will reform libel laws

A Bill to protect freedom of speech and reform the libel laws is to be introduced into Parliament, it was announced in the Queen's Speech.

BBC to investigate news censorship claims

The alleged censorship was exposed by a YouTube clip of a BBC report shown in Malaysia

Invisible Ink: No 118 - Charles Wood

Plays are the most ephemeral of the creative arts, and it always strikes me as odd that most revivals fall into two camps: musicals or Shakespeare. Lately we've had a few reinventions, such as One Man, Two Guvnors, but many plays don't get revived because they are topical, only partially well-received by the public, or too expensive to restage. Charles Wood has fallen foul of all three of these factors at once.

Ian Burrell: Intrusion is unpleasant – but sometimes it's justified

Intrusive as it sounds, a stranger being able to hack into a private email account and root around for information may sometimes be in the public interest. And journalists urgently need a public-interest defence so they can do just that.

At the height of unrest in Bahrain, the British Government said it would review arms exports to the country

UK accused of 'double standards' over weapons exports to Bahrain

Rights groups say situation in flashpoint country is being ignored while 'commercial interests' are put first

Patrick Flanery was born in Omaha, Nebraska, has lived in Britain for 11 years, and has family and friends in South Africa

Patrick Flanery: An American abroad lives in black and white

The former literary scout sets his debut novel in post-apartheid South Africa – and creates another, fictional writer. By James Kidd

News Corp - As the phone-hacking scandal escalated, News Corp’s chairman Rupert Murdoch (pictured with his wife Wendi Deng) set up the Management & Standards Committee as a way of showing good corporate governance and
giving his British newspapers a clean bill of health. Its findings have contributed to one title being closed and another now stands on the brink

Steve Richards: No one is above the law – and that includes journalists at 'The Sun'

The manner in which parts of the media condemn the various investigations into their conduct highlights how they got into trouble in the first place. In the past, some journalists behaved as if they were above the law. Some appear to expect now a higher threshold of leniency or tolerance compared with everyone else. At the very least they demand a generous sense of proportion that they do not apply when reporting on politicians or others.

Fears that Leveson Inquiry will delay libel law reform

The Government's planned changes to English libel laws should not wait or be delayed by the outcome of Lord Justice Leveson's review of press ethics and practices, according to a leading campaigner on defamation reform.

Rogelio Hernandez: Voice actor who dubbed more than 1,000 films

For over a half a century and for tens of millions of Spaniards the grainy baritone voice of the actor and film dubber Rogelio Hernandez was indistinguishable from those of some of Hollywood's greatest stars, from Marlon Brando and Tony Curtis to Richard Harris and Cary Grant.

Joan Smith: Strong religious belief is no excuse for intimidation

It's been a dreadful week for free speech. A meeting at a prestigious London college had to be abandoned on Monday evening when members of the audience were filmed and threatened by an Islamic extremist. Then the president of a student society at another London college was forced to resign after a Muslim organisation called for a ban on a joky image of the Prophet Mohammed. Finally, on Friday, the author Sir Salman Rushdie cancelled an appearance at India's largest literary festival, saying he feared an assassination attempt after protests by Muslim clerics.

Katy Guest: Rant & Rave

Rant

Face to watch: Ollie Dabbous is about to put his name where his talent is with his own hotly anticipated restaurant/bar Dabbous. From 16 January, 39 Whitfield Street, London W1

Russian media officials fired in alleged 'muzzling'

The owner of Russia's top media holding company fired an editor and a senior manager on Tuesday over what he described as an "ethical breach," but some media rights activists and journalists called it an attempt to muzzle criticism of alleged vote fraud during this month's national election.

Archie Bland: The Internet is just too big to censor the dirty bits

You couldn't fault him for a lack of ambition. But for a telecommunications minister, India's Kapil Sibal appears to be lacking in an understanding of telecommunications.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine