Andy McSmith's Diary: Ghost of Robert Maxwell haunts the Chilcot

It seems a lifetime ago since Sir John Chilcot's stopped taking evidence for his inquiry into the origin of the Iraq War and went away to write his report. The public part of the inquiry began on 24 November 2009 and ended on 2 February 2011. Two years, two months and three weeks have since slipped by, with no firm indication yet of when we might see Sir John's conclusions. This is taking so long that even the House of Lords, a place in which time normally stands still, is showing signs of impatience.

Archbishop sorry for child abuse failings

The Archbishop of Canterbury has apologised to victims of child abuse in a Church of England diocese after an inquiry by his own office found "fresh and disturbing" allegations against members of the clergy.

Surprises, Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough

Although he had toyed with the idea before, Alan Ayckbourn did not feel ready to bring science fiction fully into his work until his 34th play. A quarter of a century later and now on his 76th play, Surprises, the writer is a well-established exponent of the form.

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Diary: Keep your eyes off me, says Celine Dion

The Mail has added to the annals of the bleeding obvious by reporting on a study which finds that some women "hate" looking at photographs of themselves. Still, on cue comes along one such woman to confirm the accuracy of the research. Wealthy Canadian singer Céline Dion was recently informed of the existence of a blog by one of the world's little people, self-explanatorily entitled "Ridiculous Pictures Of Céline Dion". Ms Dion was not amused, and Duckumu (also known as Nick, 26, from Brooklyn), the humble blogger responsible, claims he received a letter from her lawyers demanding he shut the site down. "Though this blog is well within the realm of 'fair use'," he insists, "I don't have the money or time to get a lawyer to respond. The dream is over." In honour of his site's demise, however, this column would like to contribute one more ridiculous picture.

The lure of Nijinsky

It's no surprise that stage and screen are fascinated by dance's most flamboyant figure. A compelling new play adds to the mystique, says Paul Taylor