Sport Roger Bannister celebrates with Chris Chataway in 1954 as he becomes the first man to run a sub-four minute mile

Sir Chris Chataway, the former world-record runner, acted as pacemaker to help Roger Bannister break the four-minute mile barrier. And he achieved so much more

Ash cloud to remain on the horizon

Ash cloud disruption to flights could last all summer as there are no signs that the eruption from the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland is about to end.

Airports resume flights as ash cloud drifts away



All UK airports were open for business this morning after the volcanic ash cloud drifted away from British airspace.

Favourable winds likely to blow volcanic ash cloud out to sea

Strong winds whipping in from the North Sea should disperse the volcanic ash cloud that has caused many UK flights to be cancelled this week, but it looks certain to delay more air passengers before it swirls into the Atlantic, forecasters said last night.

Travellers stranded as flights grounded by ash cloud

There was chaos and confusion at UK airports today as the Icelandic volcanic ash cloud wreaked yet more havoc with flight schedules.

Plane engines checked for damage after every flight through ash cloud

Passenger planes are being checked for ash damage to their engines before every take-off and after every landing at UK airports as part of increased safety measures, the National Air Traffic Services (Nats) confirmed yesterday.

Richard Ingrams: Why show the debate where lots of us can't see it?

I searched the Evening Standard TV guide on Thursday to try to find details of the great election debate but there was nothing to say when it was on or on which channel you could watch it.

Simon Calder: The week of travelling dangerously

The capitulation, when finally it arrived, happened at breathtaking speed. At 8pm on Tuesday evening, when most of the skies over Europe had been declared safe despite the presence of tiny particles of volcanic ash, National Air Traffic Services (NATS) maintained it was unsafe to land at Britain's airports.

RAF jets return to skies after ash alert

The RAF's Typhoon Eurofighters took to the skies again today after tests showed volcanic ash found in engines caused no damage.

RAF grounds fighter jets after volcanic dust is found in engines

Air authorities seek to play down threat to passenger planes after particles are discovered in £69m Typhoon training aircraft

RAF suspends jet training over engine ash alert

The RAF has suspended Typhoon training flights after deposits of volcanic ash were found in the engines.

Ryanair U-turn as weary Britons return home

Thousands of Britons headed back to the UK today as airlines ran near-normal services again following the ash cloud crisis.

David Prosser: Praise for a regulator that got it right

Outlook The great British airspace shutdown has been a fascinating case study in regulation – and the response to it. When the Civil Aviation Authority first declared the UK a no-fly zone at the end of last week, its safety-first approach was universally applauded, even by the airline and travel industries. It was only when these businesses began to feel the financial effects of the shutdown that they began squealing – louder and louder as the bill escalated.

Leading article: Learning the right lessons

The suddenness with which the civil aviation authorities lifted the ban on aircraft flying through the cloud of volcanic ash which has been moving above these islands for the past week has raised concerns that the ban was too heavy-handed in its extent and degree. It is important that the authorities now make public the scientific considerations which led to the ban, and its lifting, but those Conservative politicians who are seeking to turn the matter into an election issue should demonstrate greater political maturity.

Air crisis goes political as 150,000 begin journey home

Opposition parties call for inquiry into Labour's 'shambolic' response to volcano

Stranded passengers begin to return home

Travellers stranded abroad by the volcanic ash cloud returned to the UK in a trickle rather than a flood today as recriminations flew about the Government's handling of the crisis.

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