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More than a year after Nadine Dorries appeared on the reality show I’m a Celebrity… she has finally done what MPs are required to do, and filled in the appropriate part of the Register of Members’ Interests. Thus we learn that being humiliated in the jungle is less lucrative than we thought. According to the Register, she was paid £6,960 while she was on the show, plus £13,268 two months later for associated interviews and photo shoots, making £20,228 in all – half what the pundits guessed she had received.

The Bachelor Boy

Profile: Cliff Richard; He doesn't like sex and for 30 years didn't eat lunch, but women have queued for days to see him as Heathcliff. Paul Vallely examines Cliff Richard's enduring appeal

. . . but Radio 1 'ban' is no fun for Status Quo

The rock band Status Quo yesterday began legal proceedings against BBC Radio 1, claiming the station has issued a "blanket ban" on producers playing its records. The group's lawyers issued a writ for breach of contract and made an application for a judicial review over whether the station's alleged playlist ban is unlawful.

Fans scale new heights for Cliff . . .

Armed with flasks of tea, camper gas stoves and provisions, 60 Cliff Richard fans are taking turns "camping out" in sub-zero temperatures in a multi-storey car park in order to buy tickets to see their pop hero.

Scotland take historic route to Grand Slam

Rugby Union

And the Word took on new meanings

Two new bibles could not be more different, says Andrew Brown

Don't tell the driver, tell his mates

Should the anti-drink-driving campaign take a different turn?

Family ordeal as Janes keeps up the tradition

Tennis

Ingredients of fame

What we eat reveals as much as how we dress. So what do John Major's gingerbread men tell us? The celebrity cookbook is a fascinating study, says Michael Bateman

A Tory offensive ...

PROFILE: Brian Mawhinney's Walsall triumph this week confirms his killer instinct.

LETTER:It's confession time

From Mr Ronnie Cass

What's the point of religion if you can't be bigoted?

I WAS brought up a Roman Catholic, so when I was a child I was frogmarched to church every Sunday. Like most children, I found Mass rather a bore, but there was one particular type of service I loathed and detested. About once a month, our local church would have an evening Folk Mass, and my mother would drag us along because she saw that the ghastly creatures who sung on these occasions strummed guitars, and she associated all guitar strumming with pop music. Seeing that we were already drifting away from the faith, she hoped that we would be so excited by the lovely pop music of the Folk Mass that we would leap back into the fold. Being teenagers, my sister and I were so speechless with rage that our parents existed at all, it was impossible to communicate with them on any level, let alone try to convey to them that Marc Bolan yelling, "Oh you don't fool the children of the revolution! No! No! No! No! No!" or Alice Cooper screaming, "No more Mr Nice Guy!" is not the same as some myopic semi-hippie and his red-faced sister bleating, "Oh Jesus is a-coming again! Tra-la! la! la! la! la! He is our savey-yah! Tra-la! Tra-la! Tra-la! Tra-la! Tra-la! la! la! la! la!". I remember simultaneously cringing with embarrassment and fuming with anger. I was going through a Maoist stage at the time, and I used to pray for Red Guards to storm into the church, drag the singers to the front and shoot them.

Dear Cliff Richard

Youth culture could be to blame for the rise in anti-social behaviour, says a new study. And who started youth culture in Britain, eh? You and your merry bus crew

A happy touch with solemn proceedings; Faith and Reason

The celebrations of VE Day provided a reminder that an official priesthood still has an invaluable role, writes Paul Handley, editor of the Church Times.

REVIEW : A shot of Gobbledegookamine for weary viewers

Cardiac Arrest (BBC1), back for a second series, appears to have lost none of its lavatorial scorn. "Phil," said Claire Maitland in the first episode, briefing a new recruit, "you work in a pool of excrement - your job is to swim for the shallow end." Last week the metaphor was stood on its end - "You find that as you climb the ladder the droppings from above just get a bit warmer," observed one of the National Health Service's walking wounded, after an encounter with the hospital manager (boo, hiss). By a coincidence of scheduling, you can compare this peculiarly British account of a health system going down the toilet with an American equivalent, ER, set in the emergency room of a public hospital.
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Harry Potter actor suffered 'severe flu-like symptoms' on a flight from London to Orlando

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Rap music mogul accused of running two men over in his truck

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Toronto tops the charts across a range of indexes
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World cities ranked in terms of safety, food security and 'liveability'

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First full-length look is finally here

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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee