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The Week in Comedy: A rude welcome to Jane Bussmann's world

I helped to write a sitcom this week. It was with Jane Bussmann, the brilliant writer on Smack the Pony, Brass Eye and South Park, among other twisted TV gems. I wasn't the only one; there were about 50 of us in the basement of London's Soho Theatre on Sunday night, lending a hand on her new six-part sitcom.

TV Review: Drama Matters: Rubenesque, Sky Living

Scheduling five one-off dramas in a prime-time slot was always going to be a ratings gamble; with no cliff-hangers or continuing storyline to keep the viewer hooked, why should we bother to tune in again next week? To enjoy great new writing like that on show in Rubenesque, that's why.

Stand-ups are made for sitcom? Don’t make me laugh

While I am a fan of Alan Carr’s stand-up work, it was a relief to hear that he had shelved plans to write and star in his own sitcom. It was due to centre on a professional dog walker but he abandoned it after discovering that Getting On duo Vicki Pepperdine and Joanna Scanlan had got to the idea first with Puppy Love, their new series for BBC4.

Edinburgh 2013: Tig Notaro - It may be her Fringe debut, but this is a

Almost exactly a year ago, the American comedian Tig Notaro walked out onto the stage at LA's Largo Theatre and announced that she had breast cancer. The ensuing set went viral and topped the Billboard comedy chart thanks largely to Louis CK who declared it to be one of a handful of "truly masterful performances" he had seen in his 27 years of comedy.

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Edinburgh 2013: Al Lubel is Mentally Al - His performance is like an

If you see Al Lubel you'll never forget his name. That's because the middle-aged New Yorker spends much of his mostly captivating hour playing with the sound of it - though not quite as much time as he spends describing how his over-protective Jewish mother smothered him.

Edinburgh 2013: Michael Che: Cartoon Violence

Tonight is one of those nights where the comedy comes dangerously close to being defined by the audience rather than the comic. The tension occasioned by audience banter gone on too long, and gone wrong, at the start of this American comedian's show casts a shadow over much of the rest of the night.