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My Week If there was any justice in the financial world, the people who run the big debt rating agencies would be hanging from lamp-posts along with the investment bankers for the way in which their activities contributed to the 2008 financial crash. But they emerged pretty well unscathed, barring a few uncomfortable sessions before congressional committees. Politicians threatened all sorts of legislative nasties at the time, but it turned out to be all sound and fury signifying not very much.

Chancellor George Osborne inched closer to meeting his deficit reduction targets today despite mounting fears over the strength of the economy

Public sector borrowing falls to £18.1bn

Chancellor George Osborne inched closer to meeting his deficit reduction targets today despite mounting fears over the strength of the economy.

Britain's AAA status is at risk, Moody's warns

The credit ratings agency Moody's last night warned Britain faces "formidable and rising challenges" to its treasured AAA status, but said it was not yet considering a downgrade.

Leading article: Mr Cameron has backed into a corner over Europe

From the last week's rising chorus of legal queries and political caveats, it would be easy to conclude that the latest effort to patch up the eurozone is falling apart before it has even come together. Better still, for David Cameron, would be the verdict that other countries' post-agreement equivocations vindicate his decision to veto the proposal.

UK worse off than France, says Francois Baron

France's finance minister took a swipe at the state of Britain's economy today hours after French experts predicted his own country would slide into a recession.

An independent girls’ school:
when parents can’t pay the fees grandparents or the schools themselves can offer help

Even the wealthy can be hit by a debt disaster

What happens when the school fees and BMW repayments can't be met? Neasa MacErlean on the middle-class poor

Lloyds Banking Group could see debt rating cut

Lloyds Banking Group was today warned its debt rating could be cut due to the sick leave of chief executive Antonio Horta-Osorio.

Market Report: Ratings boost gives drugs firm Hikma a healthy glow

Investors were told to stop worrying about the Arab Spring and pile into Hikma yesterday. The Jordan-based generic drugs maker was driven up 35p to 665p after Morgan Stanley argued that despite recent conflicts, the pharmaceuticals market in North Africa and the Middle East remained on course to soar.

What George Osborne said – and what he really meant

"We are in debt crisis. You can't borrow your way out of debt"

Markets shrug off mixed signals as hopes of euro rescue deal spark rally

Stock markets bounced on hopes that European policymakers would finally tackle the debt crisis with decisive action yesterday, although the results of an Italian bond auction showed that nervousness continued to linger in the background.

ONS figures underline manufacturing slowdown

The latest figures from the Office for National Statistics reinforce a picture of a significant slowdown in the UK manufacturing sector. Output edged up 0.1 per cent in July, after falling 0.4 per cent in June. And the ONS's overall index of production, which includes mining and energy industries, fell by 0.2 per cent over the month.

Moody's cuts its rating for Japan

Moody's cut its rating on Japan's government debt by one notch to Aa3 yesterday, blaming a build-up of debt since the 2009 global recession and revolving-door political leadership that has hampered effective economic strategies.

Japan sees credit rating downgraded

Moody's Investors Service downgraded Japan's credit rating, citing the country's weak growth prospects, massive government debt and constant political turmoil.

Keep it in the family, but avoid rifts with relations

More people are bypassing traditional lenders in favour of intergenerational loans. Roz Sanderson reports

When the price is not right: Why is a $50m record collection unable to sell for even a fraction of its value?

Sometimes unique items aren't worth what we think, discovers Phil Boucher

Backlash over US downgrade

Standard & Poor's, the credit rating agency, is trying to forestall a backlash from local governments in the US, which were outraged when the company downgraded the US credit rating earlier this month.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago