Arts and Entertainment David Lynch, Untitled (England). Late 1980s, early 1990s

A recurring motif in his films, Lynch first started photographing abandonned factories in the early 1980s

We're on the road to nowhere; CINEMA

Question: What have David Lynch and Countdown presenter Richard Whiteley got in common? Answer: They have both turned the uneasy pause into a moment of transcendental signification. Lynch's Lost Highway (18) is full of such disconcerting silences, often stretched to the point of absurdity, yet still delivering their payload of overpowering dread: empty space has rarely been so thick and murderous.

CRITIC'S CHOICEPeter Conchie

1. Grosse Pointe

Fired up with a shot of David Lynch

Self-indulgent to the point of pottiness, 'Trigger Happy' still scores, thanks to Jeff Goldblum, Gabriel Byrne and Richard Dreyfuss; CINEMA

Dunblane fails to curb TV violence

Television viewers saw more than 1,000 shootings in fewer than 250 of the most violent films broadcast last year, despite the national mood of shock following the Dunblane tragedy, the National Viewers' and Listeners' Association said yesterday. While gun ownership sparked a political and social debate, it did not affect the bullets flying on the four main channels, said the association's annual report on television violence.

CINEMA: Return of the Lynch mob

Ever since `Twin Peaks', David Lynch's career has foundered. Dennis Lim asks if his new film marks a return to form

Obituary: Jack Nance

Few images in contemporary cinema resonate as does the startling poster for the director David Lynch's equally startling feature debut, the 1977 film Eraserhead. Back-lit, hair resembling an uncontrollable lavatory brush inadvertently merged with a black-and-white aurora borealis, one eye staring upwards (naturally), the other eye shaded, the pupil alone barely visible, this was the face of Jack Nance, playing Lynch's creation Henry Spencer, the truly disturbed father of a monstrous, ill-formed mutated baby, a child who wreaks terrible, awesome revenge on Henry for causing it to be born.

Cut the slap

Wim Wenders has always walked out of any movie where he feels the use of violence is gratuitous. Now he's gone a step further, and banished it altogether from the cinema screen.

Gruesome deaths

TV Review: American Gothic

All stitched up - well, nearly

It's a made-for-TV film with artistic credentials, a weird cast of characters - and it's four and a half hours long. `The great accomplishment of The Kingdom is its blending of black comedy, farce and ghost story'

Log on, and the plot thickens ...

Mark Chadbourn offers chapter and verse on software designed to cure writer's block

ARTS; The man who had everything

'Sometimes I look at my life and think, no one would believe this'

Cinema these days - it's a riot

Crombie's idea of rollicking comedy is to spray banjo music across the soundtrack while rustics punch each other. Donovan fans are welcome to it

Are these really the 100 best films?

To celebrate the 100th birthday of cinema, the BBC is dusting off its a rchives to bring us the best movies of all time ... or so it says. ryan gilbey br owses through Auntie's choices in an attempt to find something to please everyo ne

FILM / Deja vu in a recurring nightmare

VADIM JEAN, the young British director of last year's Leon the Pig Farmer, has changed course dramatically with his new film. Beyond Bedlam (18) is a psychological thriller-cum- horror flick, subtitled 'Welcome to your worst nightmare'.

FILM / Eye for an eye, truth for a truth

In a dull movie landscape, Careful (no certificate) shines like a glorious beacon in a grey and costive world. It's set in the early century, in an imaginary Swiss mountain village where avalanches are set off by the bleat of a single lamb. The inhabitants - all surveyed through a livid orange miasma - live on tiptoe. 'Lower the sheepskins]' (to muffle the sound) is the muted cry, when there is cause for celebration.
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Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
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‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
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Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

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