Arts and Entertainment David Lynch, Untitled (England). Late 1980s, early 1990s

A recurring motif in his films, Lynch first started photographing abandonned factories in the early 1980s

ARTS / Lives of the great songs: When the pink bubble bursts: Over the Rainbow: On the surface it's pure innocence. But there's more to Judy Garland's theme tune than lemon drops. In the eighth part of our series, Mary Harron tells its story

TEN YEARS ago, Jerry Lee Lewis played the Wembley Country Music Festival. He flew in shrouded in scandal. Drugs and alcohol had left him with a quarter of his stomach, the US government was pursuing him for tax evasion, he had shot his bass player in a fit of pique, and there had been the mysterious death of his fourth wife (not to be confused with the mysterious death of his third wife). He seemed to be riding out his own damnation. Jerry Lee probably wouldn't show, and if he did he'd do only country music, as it pleased him to frustrate his fans by refusing them his greatest hits.

CINEMA / Tango through the motions

THE FRENCH director Patrice Leconte's recent work has been almost a cinema of sexual solipsism, devoted to the solitary and fetishistic - only the lonely need apply. In the film that made his name in Britain, Monsieur Hire (1988), he made a tragic hero out of a voyeur. Then came a wistful comedy about a man's life-long devotion to breasts and barbers, The Hairdresser's Husband (1990). Now he serves up a misogynistic menage a trois in Tango (15): a lark about lady-killing that might be retitled Three Men in a Bate.

FILM / Every picture tells a Storyville: Adam Mars-Jones reviews the week's new releases, Mark Frost's Storyville and Tango, a black comedy

IF DAVID LYNCH was responsible for the lurid side of Twin Peaks, his collaborator Mark Frost seemed to be in charge of the less eye-catching business of construction and plot logistics. To see how paradoxically flat the unrestrainedly bizarre can fall in the absence of such basics, you have only to cast an eye at Lynch's Twin Peaks prequel, Fire Walk With Me, while Frost's new film, Storyville (15), shows off his less strident talents, as screenwriter and director.

FILM / Orchestral manoeuvres in the dark: Meltdown explores the difficult marriage of sight and sound in films. Kevin Jackson is given a conducted tour of soundtracks by the composers George Benjamin and Benedict Mason

ALL ART, Walter Pater declared, aspires to the condition of music; but then, he was writing before the days of Melies and the Lumiere Brothers. In the 20th century, it might be more appropriate to say that some music aspires to the condition of cinema. This, anyway, is one of the possibilities suggested by Meltdown, a week- long festival devised for the South Bank by the British composer George Benjamin. Meltdown will encompass a wide variety of work, including concerts, dance and installation pieces, but one of its main concerns is to reflect on and illustrate the various ways in which film and music may complement, criticise or compete with each other.

ROCK / Review: Mirror shades: Jasper Rees on Chris Isaak and his amazing performing suit at the Apollo

CHRIS Isaak has been touring Britain with two disco globes. One dangles where you'd expect it to, sending a thousand tacky points of light to all corners of the auditorium. The other, dismantled and reassembled, is a suit. At first, this looks like a smack on the wrist for those who dismiss the man as no more than a pastiche of a pop singer. You'd never catch Presley or Orbison, or any of the other all-American crooners of whom Isaak is apparently a composite, in one of those. And yet, as garments go, it was kind of fitting. What suit could more appropriately clothe a musician whose songs are a perfect likeness of other songs than one made out of mirrors?

Obituary: Bernie Wayne

Bernie Wayne, composer and lyricist: born Paterson, New Jersey 1919; married; died Marina del Rey, California 18 April 1993.

Higher peaks in view: The man who wrote Twin Peaks has plans to get weirder. Mark Frost talked to Kevin Jackson about Sherlock and warlocks

SOMETIMES things are not what they seem. Beneath the surfaces of Walter Hill's noisy biker musical Streets of Fire and John Boorman's urban thriller Point Blank are themes derived from the Arthurian cycle and the Grail romances. Ron Howard's Willow and George Miller's Mad Max series both draw on the kitty of motifs provided by The Hero with a Thousand Faces, a scholarly work of comparative mythology by the late Joseph Campbell. And sometimes the inspiration for popular shows can be even more recondite, as in the case of Twin Peaks, now departed from our screens but - as proved by the Japanese craze for Peaks holidays reported earlier this week in The Independent - certainly not forgotten.

Out of Japan: Destination Twin Peaks for the ultimate flight into fantasy

TOKYO - In the crowded commuter trains, blue-suited salarymen and neatly stockinged office women seem to exist in a drab world of anonymous conformity. But behind impassive exteriors, wonderful and marvellous things are going on in people's minds. Many will be reading manga, the adult comics with outlandish stories of aliens, gangsters, kinky sex and boyish sports heroes. Some will be dozing from sleep deprivation after staying up to watch the outre late-night game shows on TV, where, for example, skimpily dressed starlets compete in licking the chocolate icing from frozen bananas.
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