Student There is concern that a ‘perfect storm’ of graduate debt, lack of finance and job insecurity is brewing

This figure rises to 75% for City investment banks, according to a new survey

Only scientist in Commons 'alarmed' at MPs' ignorance

The only scientist in the House of Commons has called for all MPs to be required to take a crash course in basic scientific techniques.

Earth-watch centre approved

An earth-watch centre for monitoring climate change, pollution and natural disasters was been approved by the Science minister David Willetts. The £5m Earth Observation Hub at Harwell in Oxfordshire will serve as a base for controlling satellites as well as conducting research.

The feral beast: Smut fails to arouse interest

A curious lack of interest from all national newspapers in the story of Barry Phelps, the Kensington and Chelsea councillor who resigned last week after he was found to have used his council email to send pictures of young boys with smutty captions.

The lost generation: Out of work, out of luck - graduates finding it tough

Life could get very hard for this generation of young adults, find Susie Mesure and Andy McCorkell

Leading article: The danger of a wasted generation

While some sections of society – homeowners with mortgages, the employees of state-rescued banks – have endured this economic downturn with relatively little pain, the impact on others has been heavy indeed. Recent university graduates have found themselves firmly in the latter category. New research from the Higher Education Policy Institute shows that unemployment among graduates is up from 11.1 per cent in December 2008 to 14 per cent in December 2009 (passing the previous peak of 13.5 per cent seen in 1983).

Theresa May to press ahead with cap on migration

Theresa May, the Home Secretary, is to press ahead with moves to impose an annual cap on migration amid disquiet among Cabinet colleagues over its impact on the economy.

Leading Article: Two Brains nails his colours to the mast

The higher education minister David Willetts, also known as Two Brains, is not only brainy but also very well informed, as he showed in his speech last week at Oxford Brookes University. It was, first and foremost, a joy to read. It sounded like a speech that had been written by the minister himself rather than a civil servant because it was not bland and boring but, rather, interesting and full of sharp references to last year's select committee report on higher education, the Dearing report and Ed Balls. He points out that the former schools secretary doesn't seem to understand that tuition fees in England are not paid upfront but are effectively a capped graduate tax.

Hamish McRae: We need new means to control deficits

We cannot go on like this. The new Government has to cut back spending and the only issue is how far and how fast it should go along that path. That is the broad message from the report of the new Office for Budget Responsibility, which has set out the background to next week's Budget.

Most universities 'cutting or freezing places'

Hundreds of thousands of students will be turned away from universities this autumn as institutions cut and freeze places, it was reported today.

Willetts plans 'degrees on the cheap' to cut costs

A radical plan for cut-price degrees was outlined by Universities Secretary David Willetts as a means of solving higher education's economic woes.

Leading article: Mr Willetts's university challenge

David Willetts's first big speech since taking office as Universities Secretary was, as one might have expected, thought-provoking. Mr Willetts is right to point out that the Government cannot rely on increasing fees alone to provide the necessary finance to ensure a world-class university system in the UK. His proposal for cut-price degrees, whereby students can study more cheaply at an institution near their home for an external degree awarded by a leading university, deserves consideration.

Weaker colleges should close in budget overhaul, says CBI chief

Weak universities may have to go to the wall and close to help more successful institutions survive, a business leader said yesterday.

Sixth of students regret going to university

One in six students would have reconsidered going to university if they had known how difficult it would be to secure a job once they graduated, a study has found.

Heads of Student Loans Company quit

The chief executive of the beleaguered Student Loans Company resigned yesterday after the Government made it clear it had no confidence in him.

Student loans company chairman sacked

The chairman of the beleaguered Student Loans Company was sacked by ministers, it emerged today.

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