Student There is concern that a ‘perfect storm’ of graduate debt, lack of finance and job insecurity is brewing

This figure rises to 75% for City investment banks, according to a new survey

Chalk Talk: How I fell victim to unreasonable force

To the University of London to hear David Willetts talk about the future of universities. Apparently, the Universities Secretary wanted to cycle to the event but was told to abandon the idea because of the presence of a large number of student demonstrators. When I arrived at Senate House they were noisily chanting near the entrance to the meeting. As I offered identification to a steward, I was grabbed by the arm and forced back against a wall. I was tempted to say "get your hands off me", but a look at the steward's face made me think this might not be a wise move. In the end, a second steward accepted my ID and I was allowed into the meeting.

Vince Cable cancels talk in face of student protests

Vince Cable last night cancelled a talk at Oxford University after being warned students were preparing to stage a major demonstration.

The Sketch: You know, I don't think anyone knows if there's anyone in the know?

We're going to look back on this as a golden age for observers. MPs, committees, ministers, the Chancellor in charge of £700bn of taxpayers' money – they're all waaaaay out of their depth. They don't know – but the better ones know they don't know, and the best know they can't ever know.

Cameron softens stance on blocking immigration

Plans for a stringent cap on numbers of immigrant workers are to be softened in the face of warnings from business leaders that it could prevent them from bringing the brightest foreign talent to Britain.

Willetts: unlimited university fees are 'unsustainable'

A free-for-all in student fees – one of the recommendations of a government inquiry into financing higher education – was effectively ruled out by the Universities Secretary David Willetts yesterday.

Science: Willetts wins funding battle with warning of 'brain drain'

British scientists gave a collective sigh of relief yesterday at the Government's decision to keep the £4.6bn science budget at the current level for the next four years, meaning that the sector has escaped with a relatively small 9 per cent cut in real terms until 2015.

Information, please: it’s time to fill the data gap

With applications and course fees rising, Sarah Morrison finds a central database is needed

Britain's 'father of IVF' wins the Nobel Prize

Maverick scientist is rewarded for his pioneering research into human fertility

Time to fill the data gap: A central database is needed as applications and course fees rise

It has been six months since a major Government review on postgraduate studies was published, and little has been done to fill what some officials describe as a "data vacuum" in the sector. Yet, with almost a quarter of students in the UK now studying at a postgraduate level, administrators say that this is the year in which the gap in statistics must start to be filled.

System of exam boards 'corrupt and diseased', says leading schools adviser

Awarding bodies accused of urging heads to use their exams because they were 'easier'

Boyd Tonkin: A minister who banks on ideas

The week in books

Poor pupils 'miss out on top universities'

A Government inquiry has been launched into why thousands of "missing" teenagers fail to get into Britain's most prestigious universities, despite getting the exam grades to warrant a place.

Scientists go on attack over reduced research spending

Ministers and scientists traded blows yesterday over the Government's threatened cuts to science funding.

Leading article: The dangers of trying to pick winners

The latest area of Government spending that has come under the public microscope ahead of the Comprehensive Spending Review is the £6bn annual science budget. The Business Secretary, Vince Cable, delivered a speech this week saying that, to cut costs, his department will stop funding "mediocre" research. And the Science Minister, David Willetts, yesterday stressed the need for universities to come up with ways of earning private money from their research through commercial development in order to reduce their reliance on the state.

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Blundering Tony Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

Blundering Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

For Arabs – and for Britons who lost their loved ones in his shambolic war in Iraq – his appointment was an insult, says Robert Fisk
Fifa corruption arrests: All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue

Fifa corruption arrests

All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue, says Ian Herbert
Isis in Syria: The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of President Assad and militant fighters

The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of Assad and Isis

In Syrian Kurdish cantons along the Turkish border, the progressive aims of the 2011 uprising are being enacted despite the war. Patrick Cockburn returns to Amuda
How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields: Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape the US

How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields

Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape to the US
Stephen Mangan interview: From posh buffoon to pregnant dad, the actor has quite a range

How Stephen Mangan got his range

Posh buffoon, hapless writer, pregnant dad - Mangan is certainly a versatile actor
The ZX Spectrum has been crowd-funded back into play - with some 21st-century tweaks

The ZX Spectrum is back

The ZX Spectrum was the original - and for some players, still the best. David Crookes meets the fans who've kept the games' flames lit
Grace of Monaco film panned: even the screenwriter pours scorn on biopic starring Nicole Kidman

Even the screenwriter pours scorn on Grace of Monaco biopic

The critics had a field day after last year's premiere, but the savaging goes on
Menstrual Hygiene Day: The strange ideas people used to believe about periods

Menstrual Hygiene Day: The strange ideas people once had about periods

If one was missed, vomiting blood was seen as a viable alternative
The best work perks: From free travel cards to making dreams come true (really)

The quirks of work perks

From free travel cards to making dreams come true (really)
Is bridge the latest twee pastime to get hip?

Is bridge becoming hip?

The number of young players has trebled in the past year. Gillian Orr discovers if this old game has new tricks
Long author-lists on research papers are threatening the academic work system

The rise of 'hyperauthorship'

Now that academic papers are written by thousands (yes, thousands) of contributors, it's getting hard to tell workers from shirkers
The rise of Lego Clubs: How toys are helping children struggling with social interaction to build better relationships

The rise of Lego Clubs

How toys are helping children struggling with social interaction to build better relationships
5 best running glasses

On your marks: 5 best running glasses

Whether you’re pounding pavements, parks or hill passes, keep your eyes protected in all weathers
Joe Root: 'Ben Stokes gives everything – he’s rubbing off on us all'

'Ben Stokes gives everything – he’s rubbing off on us all'

Joe Root says the England dressing room is a happy place again – and Stokes is the catalyst
Raif Badawi: Wife pleads for fresh EU help as Saudi blogger's health worsens

Please save my husband

As the health of blogger Raif Badawi worsens in prison, his wife urges EU governments to put pressure on the Saudi Arabian royal family to allow her husband to join his family in Canada