Student There is concern that a ‘perfect storm’ of graduate debt, lack of finance and job insecurity is brewing

This figure rises to 75% for City investment banks, according to a new survey

Chalk Talk: How I fell victim to unreasonable force

To the University of London to hear David Willetts talk about the future of universities. Apparently, the Universities Secretary wanted to cycle to the event but was told to abandon the idea because of the presence of a large number of student demonstrators. When I arrived at Senate House they were noisily chanting near the entrance to the meeting. As I offered identification to a steward, I was grabbed by the arm and forced back against a wall. I was tempted to say "get your hands off me", but a look at the steward's face made me think this might not be a wise move. In the end, a second steward accepted my ID and I was allowed into the meeting.

Vince Cable cancels talk in face of student protests

Vince Cable last night cancelled a talk at Oxford University after being warned students were preparing to stage a major demonstration.

The Sketch: You know, I don't think anyone knows if there's anyone in the know?

We're going to look back on this as a golden age for observers. MPs, committees, ministers, the Chancellor in charge of £700bn of taxpayers' money – they're all waaaaay out of their depth. They don't know – but the better ones know they don't know, and the best know they can't ever know.

Cameron softens stance on blocking immigration

Plans for a stringent cap on numbers of immigrant workers are to be softened in the face of warnings from business leaders that it could prevent them from bringing the brightest foreign talent to Britain.

Willetts: unlimited university fees are 'unsustainable'

A free-for-all in student fees – one of the recommendations of a government inquiry into financing higher education – was effectively ruled out by the Universities Secretary David Willetts yesterday.

Science: Willetts wins funding battle with warning of 'brain drain'

British scientists gave a collective sigh of relief yesterday at the Government's decision to keep the £4.6bn science budget at the current level for the next four years, meaning that the sector has escaped with a relatively small 9 per cent cut in real terms until 2015.

Information, please: it’s time to fill the data gap

With applications and course fees rising, Sarah Morrison finds a central database is needed

Britain's 'father of IVF' wins the Nobel Prize

Maverick scientist is rewarded for his pioneering research into human fertility

Time to fill the data gap: A central database is needed as applications and course fees rise

It has been six months since a major Government review on postgraduate studies was published, and little has been done to fill what some officials describe as a "data vacuum" in the sector. Yet, with almost a quarter of students in the UK now studying at a postgraduate level, administrators say that this is the year in which the gap in statistics must start to be filled.

System of exam boards 'corrupt and diseased', says leading schools adviser

Awarding bodies accused of urging heads to use their exams because they were 'easier'

Boyd Tonkin: A minister who banks on ideas

The week in books

Poor pupils 'miss out on top universities'

A Government inquiry has been launched into why thousands of "missing" teenagers fail to get into Britain's most prestigious universities, despite getting the exam grades to warrant a place.

Scientists go on attack over reduced research spending

Ministers and scientists traded blows yesterday over the Government's threatened cuts to science funding.

Leading article: The dangers of trying to pick winners

The latest area of Government spending that has come under the public microscope ahead of the Comprehensive Spending Review is the £6bn annual science budget. The Business Secretary, Vince Cable, delivered a speech this week saying that, to cut costs, his department will stop funding "mediocre" research. And the Science Minister, David Willetts, yesterday stressed the need for universities to come up with ways of earning private money from their research through commercial development in order to reduce their reliance on the state.

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Independent Travel
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona from £629pp
Dubrovnik
Vietnam
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South Africa
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Prices correct as of 12 December 2014
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'You look for someone who's an inspiration and try to be like them'

Homeless Veterans appeal

In 2010, Sgt Gary Jamieson stepped on an IED in Afghanistan and lost his legs and an arm. He reveals what, and who, helped him to make a remarkable recovery
Could cannabis oil reverse the effects of cancer?

Could cannabis oil reverse effects of cancer?

As a film following six patients receiving the controversial treatment is released, Kate Hilpern uncovers a very slippery issue
The Interview movie review: You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here

The Interview movie review

You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here
Serial mania has propelled podcasts into the cultural mainstream

How podcasts became mainstream

People have consumed gripping armchair investigation Serial with a relish typically reserved for box-set binges
Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up for hipster marketing companies

Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up

Kevin Lee Light, aka "Jesus", is the newest client of creative agency Mother while rival agency Anomaly has launched Sexy Jesus, depicting the Messiah in a series of Athena-style poses
Rosetta space mission voted most important scientific breakthrough of 2014

A memorable year for science – if not for mice

The most important scientific breakthroughs of 2014
Christmas cocktails to make you merry: From eggnog to Brown Betty and Rum Bumpo

Christmas cocktails to make you merry

Mulled wine is an essential seasonal treat. But now drinkers are rediscovering other traditional festive tipples. Angela Clutton raises a glass to Christmas cocktails
5 best activity trackers

Fitness technology: 5 best activity trackers

Up the ante in your regimen and change the habits of a lifetime with this wearable tech
Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Club World Cup kicked into the long grass by the continued farce surrounding Blatter, Garcia, Russia and Qatar
Frank Warren column: 2014 – boxing is back and winning new fans

Frank Warren: Boxing is back and winning new fans

2014 proves it's now one of sport's biggest hitters again
Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton: The power dynamics of the two first families

Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton

Karen Tumulty explores the power dynamics of the two first families
Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley with a hotbed of technology start-ups

Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley

The Swedish capital is home to two of the most popular video games in the world, as well as thousands of technology start-ups worth hundreds of millions of pounds – and it's all happened since 2009
Did Japanese workers really get their symbols mixed up and display Santa on a crucifix?

Crucified Santa: Urban myth refuses to die

The story goes that Japanese store workers created a life-size effigy of a smiling "Father Kurisumasu" attached to a facsimile of Our Lord's final instrument of torture
Jennifer Saunders and Kate Moss join David Walliams on set for TV adaptation of The Boy in the Dress

The Boy in the Dress: On set with the stars

Walliams' story about a boy who goes to school in a dress will be shown this Christmas
La Famille Bélier is being touted as this year's Amelie - so why are many in the deaf community outraged by it?

Deaf community outraged by La Famille Bélier

The new film tells the story of a deaf-mute farming family and is being touted as this year's Amelie