Student There is concern that a ‘perfect storm’ of graduate debt, lack of finance and job insecurity is brewing

This figure rises to 75% for City investment banks, according to a new survey

Minister defends research funding squeeze

Science Minister David Willetts defended the Government's planned squeeze on research funding today, saying a stronger link between academics and business could result.

Steve Smith: 'Why shouldn't we raise fees?'

As universities await their most radical shake-up in years, the leader of the vice-chancellors' association tells Richard Garner why it's time to face financial facts

Debt fears see thousands pull out of university race

Thousands of young people gave up their scramble for a university place yesterday as the search for the few remaining vacancies intensified.

180,000 pupils, one goal: to find a university place

The mother of all mad scrambles for university places began in earnest yesterday with at least 180,000 young people desperately searching for a course.

On the phones: 'I've only had two people break down in tears. That's good'

The UCAS call centre breaks the good news - and the bad

186,000 students enter clearing for university place

More than 186,000 students entered clearing today in search of a rare vacant university place.

Over 3,000 'A' students to be turned away from their chosen universities

Minister says squeeze will affect even those with the best results

Richard Garner: After years of aspiration, thousands will feel betrayed

No one can doubt that universities are bearing the brunt of cuts in spending in the education service.

Leading article: A raw deal for a generation of students

Amid the usual scenes of jubilation across the country today as students receive their A-level results, there will be an unusually large amount of dejection. And, in a bitter irony, it will be concentrated among some of the brightest school- leavers. More than 3,000 students who have achieved three A-grade passes are expected to find themselves without a university place to look forward to in the autumn. They should probably not turn to the Universities minister, David Willetts, if they want to be cheered up. In an interview with The Independent today Mr Willetts advises students who find themselves in such a predicament to apply to "slightly less competitive" universities next year.

Mandelson tops MPs' summer reading list

Books about the New Labour government feature highly in MPs' summer reading lists ahead of the publication of former prime minister Tony Blair's hotly anticipated memoirs, a survey revealed today.

One-third of university students unhappy with lecturers' performance

Thousands of university students still find their lecturers too remote despite pledges that standards of service would improve with the introduction of top-up fees of up to £3,225 a year.

Limits on student numbers must be lifted, say heads

With few jobs available, universities must be allowed to admit more undergraduates this year

Leading article: Dangerous echoes of Thatcherism

It might be called the curious incident of the milk in the summertime. A Scottish newspaper, the Glasgow Sunday Herald, revealed – on the basis of a leaked letter from the Health minister – that the Government was planning to end free milk for children in nurseries, the argument being that in these straitened times the provision was poor value for money and outdated. But no sooner had David Willetts, the Universities Minister, justified keeping all options open, than officials in Downing Street denied it. The Prime Minister, they made known, did not like the idea of five-year-olds having their free milk scrapped.

A* grades not enough to get into Cambridge

Up to 8,000 university hopefuls have been rejected by Cambridge this year despite being expected to get at least one A* grade in their A-level exams later this month.

Confusion as government rules out school milk cut

Coalition proposals for scrapping free school milk descended into confusion today after Downing Street insisted the cut would not go ahead.

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