Kevin Pietersen celebrated his century against Pakistan in Dubai in February but England must now do without him in ODIs

Pietersen now willing to play in World T20

Kevin Pietersen has revealed he still hopes to play in the World Twenty20 later this year even though his England central contract would currently prevent him from doing so.

Indian sky watchers witness the Transit of Venus

A rare celestial spectacle, the Transit of Venus, unfolded in the morning sky across India yesterday.

Cabinet Office minister Oliver Letwin

Diary: Crossed wires make a splash out of Letwin's bin dumping

Henry Macrory, the former tabloid hack and much-liked spinner for the Tory Party, told a tale of classic misunderstanding at his farewell party in Downing Street.

Kevin Pietersen made just 5 but signed off with a win in his final match for Delhi in the IPL

Alarm bells at New Road over floods alert

Worcestershire are set to go on flood watch after the abandonment of their match with Nottinghamshire at rain-battered New Road yesterday.

Cutting edge: Kevin Pietersen declared prematurely he had returned to form

Pietersen remains below average in Subcontinent

As soon as this tour of Sri Lanka is done next Saturday, Kevin Pietersen is off to the Indian Premier League. He is excited about the prospect of playing for Delhi Daredevils, less so about returning to England early from the tournament to play in a County Championship match which also coincides with his son's birthday.

Last night's viewing - Empire, BBC1; David Hockney: the Art of Seeing, BBC2

Could the BBC have found a more imperial presenter for Empire than Jeremy Paxman? I doubt it, frankly. He's been burnished by years in the Newsnight chair to a high gloss of viceregal self-assurance. As the opening sequence of his new series demonstrated, he can even arch an eyebrow at British imperium itself: "How did such a small country get such a big head?" he asked scornfully as he began an episode devoted to the British exercise of power. The big head, it turned out, was a necessary condition rather than a consequence. In India, fewer than 6,000 British officials held dominion over 200 million people, an improbability achieved partly by classic divide-and-rule techniques but also by means of a dazzling confidence trick. Visiting Government House in Calcutta – an imposing relic of Imperial India – Paxman argued that the classical facade was an instrument of authority. By looking as if they were entitled to run the country the British ensured that they would continue to do so: "It helps to explain that arrogant, self-satisfied look you see on the face of so many British imperialists," said Paxman, who more than once appeared to be offering us a helpful reconstruction of a Victorian sense of manifest destiny. He's grand enough to interview a maharajah in his palace and make it look as if he's the one giving the audience.

Indian police investigate 'suicide' of Olympus executive

Indian police were last night investigating whether the apparent suicide of a senior executive of scandal-hit Japanese firm was related to the company’s problems back home.

Kevin Pietersen trudges back to the pavilion after scoring just 14 against Pakistan on Monday

Pietersen silent on his form but disquiet grows

As the desert sand settled around Alastair Cook's sterling century yesterday, the attention moved sharply to his opening partner. It has never shifted far from Kevin Pietersen since a balmy day at the Oval in 2005 when he plundered Australia but there is the undoubted sense now that he is playing for his one-day career.

Travel Challenge: Hiking in Nepal

Each week we invite three companies to offer us their best deal for a specific holiday. Today: a two-week hiking holiday in Nepal.

Homai Vyarawalla: Photographer

Homai Vyarawalla, who died on 15 January at the age of 98, was widely acknowledged to be India's first woman photojournalist. She took photographs of key events that would have a decisive impact on Indian history, including the meeting where leaders voted for the plan for India's partition. She also photographed the first flag-hoisting ceremony, at Red Fort on 15 August 1947, the departure of Lord Mountbatten from India and the funerals of Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru and Lal Bahadur Shastri.

Trail of the unexpected: Cycling in Delhi

A cycling tour in the Indian capital throws up some peculiar challenges, as Nick Boulos discovers

India's new jewel delights drivers

Hamilton hails new track but suffers grid penalty after setting fastest time in first practice session

Liverpool open academy in Delhi

Liverpool launched their first football academy in India yesterday.

Contractors still waiting for £50m from Delhi Games organisers

Nine months after India hosted the Commonwealth Games, companies around the world are still owed tens of millions of pounds in outstanding payments. They say they have run into a brick wall in dealing with officials in Delhi, where the issue had become entangled in a wide-ranging criminal investigation.

Delhi Belly: Bollywood's rude awakening

It's been dubbed The Hangover of Bollywood, full of F-word expletives, flatulence, right royal cock-ups and a bunch of dufus friends who never seem to get it right in love, money or work. Delhi Belly, produced by Aamir Khan, one of India's biggest movie stars, and starring his nephew Imran Khan, had its international premiere last night at the launch of the London Indian Film Festival (LIFF).

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