Arts and Entertainment Tamera Foster left the competition tonight after a sing-off with Luke Friend

Tamera lost to Luke Friend after James Arthur and Rebecca Ferguson performed

David Lister: Annie get your (politically correct) gun

Those who like musicals will know that Irving Berlin's Annie Get Your Gun has one of the great scores. Watching the new production of the show at the Young Vic in London with Jane Horrocks, it was good to be reminded of showstoppers such as "Anything You Can Do" and "There's No Business Like Show Business".

Hit & Run: A Marr, superstar?

According to the advertisements for his latest book, The Making of Modern Britain, Andrew Marr is "Britain's favourite broadcaster". Marr may indeed be the favourite broadcaster of Britain's media and middle classes, though messrs Paxman, Dimbleby or Davies – Evan, not Alan – might have something to say about it. Surely, however, the BBC's former political editor can't lay serious claim to the title of most popular man on the box when the two big programmes he presents go out at 9am on a Sunday (The Andrew Marr Show, BBC1), when nobody but the cabinet minister being interviewed and a couple of their aides is even awake; and 9am on a Monday (Start the Week, Radio 4), when most of us are out of earshot on a tube somewhere, glazedly wondering where the weekend went.

Lisa Hannigan - Dawn of fame for down to earth diva

From idyllic rural upbringing, all nature and play, to a Mercury prize nomination, Ben Walsh charts the enigmatically sweet Lisa Hannigan's trajectory

Pandora: Expenses scandal hits the Beeb's newsroom

What's this? While BBC editors work themselves into a lather over MPs' expenses, a tale of excess from within their own ranks.

A compilation of Russell Brand's radio shows reveals there's life after 'Sachsgate'

I've no doubt that some critics of Russell Brand might suggest that a portion of the monies received for his new four-disc compilation, The Best of What's Legal, charting his former Radio 2 show, should be diverted to pay the BBC's £150,000 fine that arose from "Sachsgate". Indeed, the compilation is introduced by Brand almost as if it were the case for the defence, reminding us how the show spent most of the time teetering on the brink of anarchy and mischief before being engulfed by it.

Elbow, Colston Hall, Bristol<br/>Thecocknbullkid, ICA, London

It's taken most of the world long enough to recognise a band with a heart and great songs

Jacko on tour: 'This will be the final curtain call. I love you, I love you all'

Crowds flock to London's O2 Arena to hear Michael Jackson reveal concert plans

BBC fined for unfair phone-in competitions

The BBC was fined £95,000 today for running unfair competitions on two radio stations.

Question Time: Dermot O'Leary, Presenter

Work: Dermot O'Leary, 35, hosts 'The X Factor' and presents a Saturday afternoon show on BBC Radio 2

Life: Girlfriend Dee is a television director; lives in Highbury, north London

Balance: Cooking, keeping fit, diving and fishing

The woman who sexed up Radio 2

Lesley Douglas, who resigned last night from the BBC, was not only the most powerful woman in British radio, she was also, in the view of some, the most influential person in this country's music industry.

On the airwaves: how to get a job in radio

Emily Palmer, 21, is a production assistant for the Dermot O’Leary show on Radio 2, find out how she got her job.

Commercial radio is struggling to stop its young stars defecting to the BBC

Picture the scenario. You, the hip young gunslinger of Middle-of-Nowhere FM, have just won several best newcomer awards after untold, unpaid years slogging it out in the broadcasting backwater of student radio.

Elisa: Bray: Caught in the Net

These days you don't need a commission from a television company to broadcast gigs. You just need a camcorder, a musician, perhaps a crowd for atmosphere and a computer to upload the material on to a website. And if you're lucky, the television companies might then make the approach to air a show.

Billy Bragg's jailhouse rock project cuts reoffending rate

Billy Bragg has backed the miners, campaigned against racism and promoted perestroika in the Soviet Union. Yet the folk-rock singer from Barking has embarked on his most ambitious socio-political project to date; an attempt to wean convicted criminals serving time away from a life of crime. And it's working.

Arsenal 5 Aston Villa 0: Mesmeric Henry leaves O'Leary on the brink

Striker's strokes of genius ensure no Euro hangover
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine