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Cardiff City FC set for Singapore float

Swine Flu Plc: Cashing in on the pandemic

Huge pharmaceutical companies, face-mask manufacturers and even internet opportunists are raking in the money. Tim Persinko and Susie Mesure report

The Week Ahead: Sunny outlook continues for Kingfisher

City analysts anticipate news of strong trading when Kingfisher, the retail group behind the B&Q chain, posts a second-quarter pre-close update this Thursday.

Janet Street-Porter: I'd be a lousy MP – and so would Esther

It's damage limitation time. David Cameron demands an immediate General Election to lance the festering boil that threatens to harm democracy, and Michael Martin steps down as Speaker. MPs will be creeping back to their constituencies tomorrow to face the music, hoping that once parliament is in recess we might tire of the expenses saga – fat chance.

The meal deal: Britain's low-cost, high fat binge

It's cheap. It's tasty. It's full of fat. Junk food is back on the menu – but what's really behind the country's craving for burgers, fries and meatball subs? Simon Usborne joins the queues

‘Real IRA’ claims blame for attack on barracks

Northern Ireland is confronting the prospect of further lethal dissident republic violence yesterday after two British soldiers were shot dead in an ambush outside an Army base near Belfast. The two soldiers, the first to die violently in Northern Ireland for more than a decade, were in desert fatigues because they were due to fly to Afghanistan the following morning.

Cadbury hits the profits sweet spot with chocolate and gum

Cadbury has revealed that consumers are refusing to give up their chocolate and chewing gum during the recession. The confectionery giant delivered tasty sales and profits in 2008 but trimmed expectations on revenue growth for this year.

Market Report: Brixton slides on fresh fund-raising chatter

Brixton slumped to its lowest level since the early 1980s last night, shedding 19p, or more than 28 per cent of its value, to 48p amid renewed speculation about the need for capital in the commercial property sector.

Domino’s Pizza to create 1,500 jobs

Domino’s Pizza has revealed that sales boomed during the recent week of heavy snow fall, as it posted full-year profits up strongly and unveiled plans to recruit 1,500 new staff this year.

Hamish McRae: Will services provide our salvation?

The UK could end up with less loss of output than Germany or Japan

Credit crisis diary: 16/02/2009

The hedge funds always win in the end

The collapse of Lloyds' share price on Friday afternoon was deeply upsetting – and not just for shareholders in the bank.

Domino’s Pizza

Directors in Domino’s Pizza have pledged more than one-fifth of the company’s shares as collateral for personal loans, the pizza delivery chain revealed yesterday. The biggest slug was pledged by Nigel Wray, a non-executive director of the company, who has pledged just over 11 per cent of its shares against a personal loan.

A slice of good fortune amid the economic gloom

Credit-crunched consumers are shunning restaurants in favour of cheaper fare offered by the likes of Domino's. James Thompson reports

Pizza sales up as diners stay at home

Cash-strapped consumers are shunning restaurant meals and ordering takeaways at home, Domino's Pizza said today as it forecast better than expected full-year profits.

Domino's Pizza beats slowdown as diners choose to eat at home

Online sales of Domino's pizza have surged ahead of its forecasts, as its half-year profits and sales were boosted by diners shunning restaurants in favour of eating at home. The company's chief executive, Chris Moore, said it had initially forecast that online orders would account for 35 per cent of total sales by 2015. Given that its half-year online sales grew by a record 85.1 per cent to £25.3m, accounting for 21.8 per cent of total sales, it expected to pass this target much earlier.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent