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The ruling follows a request for advice from The Netherlands about three gay refugees seeking asylum from Uganda, Sierra Leone and Senegal

Sir Ian Brownlie: International lawyer who fought for human rights and civil liberties

Sir Ian Brownlie QC, who died in a car accident in Egypt where he was on holiday, was an international lawyer who was as successful in practise as he was in academia. Widely respected for his integrity, knowledge of cases and sharp mind, he was also acknowledged for his warmth and sense of humour, and his "cab-rank principle", which meant if he was free he was available, which often saw him taking on unfashionable clients and causes. He practised in public international law and human rights, and appeared in a full range of international tribunals, including the International Court of Justice, the European Court of Human Rights and the European Court of Justice. He also acted as an arbitrator in a number of cases where his clients were usually states.

EU judges ponder peep show puzzle

The owner of a Belgian sex shop today posed a puzzler for European judges - does a coin-in-the-slot peep show count as a cinema?

Delayed air passengers to benefit from compensation ruling

Airline passengers facing long delays should receive the same cash compensation as those whose flights are cancelled, European judges ruled today.

Andrew Grice: Cameron is raising great expectations that may lead to a very bleak House

Inside Politics: Mr Cameron said he would not let matters rest if the Lisbon Treaty became law, he is doing just that

Backlash at Cameron over Euro referendum

Conservative leader under fire from his party – and from UK's European allies

Cameron backs down on EU treaty referendum

David Cameron declared yesterday that he would not allow his premiership to be dominated by a "massive bust-up" with the European Union as he shelved any Europe referendum for at least five years.

EU takes UK to court over internet privacy

Ministers face an embarrassing showdown in court after the European Commission accused Britain of failing to protect its citizens from secret surveillance on the internet.

Tories to reclaim power over planning decisions

Business leaders fear ministers' rulings will be influenced by politics

'Shocking' sickness rates in social work

Stress blamed for absence rate that is 60% higher than national average

Future to focus on rehabilitation for torture brothers

Boys likely to serve sentence in secure children's home

Nick Cartwright: A verdict that forces the hand of prosecutors

The House of Lords judgment fails to address the question of whether travelling abroad with a loved one is the criminal act of assisted suicide – but it does require the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) to publish guidelines on how he makes a decision to prosecute, or not.

Business Diary: Second time lucky for Gowers in PR

So best of luck then to Andrew Gowers, the former Financial Times editor, who yesterday began his new job as head of PR at the oil giant BP. Let's hope for both their sakes that this posting lasts a little longer than Gowers' previous spinning engagement – he was head of European PR for Lehman Brothers.

Lindt's chocolate bunny bares its teeth at upstart

What would the peace-loving Easter bunny say? Two of Europe's best-known chocolate companies spent yesterday locked in hearings at the European Court of Justice (ECJ) over the delicate question of whether it is legally permissible to trademark a chocolate rabbit.

Leading article: Outdated age discrimination

When the Government scrapped the mandatory retirement age for civil servants in October, they were lauded for being progressive. After all, we live in a society with lengthening life expectancy. People over 60 are more active than ever before. So it is only right that the state recognise this. Indeed, it would be hypocrisy to send 65-year-old civil servants home for good while the House of Commons is packed with 89 MPs over the retirement age and the House of Lords is often referred to as Britain's most expensive retirement home.

Employers <u>can</u> force staff to retire at 65

Pensioners who claimed Britain was guilty of age discrimination lose their legal battle after ruling by European Court of Justice
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Netherlands' goalkeeper Tim Krul fails to make a save from Costa Rica's midfielder Celso Borges during a penalty shoot-out in the quarter-final between Netherlands and Costa Rica during the 2014 FIFA World Cup
newsGoalkeepers suffer from 'gambler’s fallacy' during shoot-outs
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Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmReview: A week late, Secret Cinema arrives as interactive screening goes Back to the Future
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Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
artCultural relations between Sydney and Melbourne soured by row over milk crate art instillation
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Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux play teeneage lovers in the French erotic drama 'Blue Is The Warmest Colour' - The survey found four times as many women admitting to same-sex experiences than 20 years ago
filmBlue Is The Warmest Colour, Bojack Horseman and Hobbit on the way
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Preparations begin for Edinburgh Festival 2014
Edinburgh festivalAll the best shows to see at Edinburgh this year
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Two giraffes pictured on Garsfontein Road, Centurion, South Africa.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices