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Domino's Pizza has named the former boss of Halfords as its new chief executive as Lance Batchelor moves on to Saga ahead of its £3 billion flotation.

David Suchet played Agatha Christie detective Poirot

David Suchet: Agatha Christie's family warned me not to make Poirot a joke

Poirot star David Suchet has revealed that Agatha Christie's family warned him not to play the Belgian detective as a joke when he was first approached about the role.

Kate Mosse is chair of the Women's Prize for Fiction board

I'll drink to that: Baileys announced as new sponsor of (formerly Orange) Women's Prize for Fiction

The winner of the Women’s Prize for Fiction next year will be able to raise a glass of cream liqueur in celebration after Baileys stepped in to sponsor the award.

Review: NOS4R2, By Joe Hill

Like father, like son, like motorcar

Brought to book: Natalie Haynes at home, surrounded by Booker contenders

Natalie Haynes: Confessions of a Booker judge

Being on the jury of the Man Booker Prize is no mean feat. With 150 books to read, Natalie Haynes barely has time to sleep. But, she says, the popularity of historical fiction means she now knows a lot more about world history

Dan Brown's Inferno: Dante-inspired book set for release day bonanza

Dan Brown's Inferno: Publishers poised for biggest-sales since Harry Potter as Da Vinci Code author's latest Robert Langdon story hits shelves

The Dante Alighieri-inspired novel is already Amazon's top-selling book despite not being available until tomorrow

Michael Gove who launched a scathing attack on the infantilisation of history teaching which is encouraging youngsters to study historical figures through Disney and Mister Men stories

Michael Gove attacks 'infantilisation' of school curriculum which encourages pupils to compare Nazis to Mr Men

Education Secretary faces growing opposition to his reforms

Keith Ridgway: A fusion of Dashiell Hammett and Paul Auster

Paperback review: Hawthorn and Child, By Keith Ridgway

The odd couple turn to crime-fighting

One Minute With: Sarah Dunant, novelist

Where are you now and what can you see?

250,000 people over 50 say they can only pay off the mortgage by selling their home

Research suggests more than a million over 50s will face shortfall when it comes to paying off their interest only mortgage

Former MP Louise Mensch

Louise Mensch finally ends cosmetic surgery speculation by admitting she had a facelift

Former Tory MP Louise Mensch's fresh-faced appearance has been the subject of repeated speculation. Now she has finally laid the cosmetic surgery rumours to rest by admitting what many suspected all along: she has had a facelift.

Shepard: Why is he not published here?

Invisible Ink: No 169 - Jim Shephard

Here's an unusual situation; an author who's certainly not dead, not unknown or out of print in his native USA, greatly admired, yet ignored and unrepresented on these shores. While UK publishers reprint the most minor Nordic crime novels, we're denied an astonishing American voice.

John Terry is happy to shake the hand of Uefa president Michel Platini but his relationship with David Bernstein has soured

This time it's John Terry who refuses to shake hands as Chelsea captain snubs FA chairman David Bernstein at Champions League trophy handover

Chelsea captain in public rebuke of FA chairman during handover of trophy

Book of a lifetime: Earthly Powers, By Anthony Burgess

Has there ever been a more grandiose title for a novel? In calling this book Earthly Powers, Anthony Burgess seems to be suggesting that he has written a novel about everything. The extraordinary thing is that in these dense 648 pages, he has.

Miranda Richardson said she was 'thrilled' that Hilary Mantel had made the shortlist

Women’s Prize for Fiction: Miranda Richardson hits out at vitriol aimed at Hilary Mantel’s on-going awards success

Actress Miranda Richardson, chair of this year’s Women’s Prize for Fiction, has hit out at the vitriol aimed at Hilary Mantel’s on-going awards success, calling it a “hideous” British trait.

Adam Johnson, who won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for his work 'The Orphan Master's Son'

Novel by Adam Johnson set inside North Korea wins Pulitzer prize

As the world waits to see what the North Korean dictatorship does next, the judges of the Pulitzer prizes yesterday honoured a novel acclaimed for its depiction of the secretive state, naming Adam Johnson’s “The Orphan Master’s Son” as the winner of the fiction award after withholding the prize last year.

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Syria civil war: Meet the military commander who says his soldiers will not rest until every inch of their war torn country is free of Islamist 'terrorists'

‘We won’t stop until Syria is back to normal’

Near the front lines with Islamist-controlled towns where Assad’s troops were besieged just last month, Robert Fisk meets a commander confidently preparing his soldiers for battle
The inside story of how Bill Clinton built a $2bn global foundation may undermine Hillary's chances

The inside story of how Bill Clinton built a $2bn global foundation...

... and how it may undermine Hillary's chances in 2016
12 best olive oils

Extra-virgin, cold-press, early-harvest, ultra-premium: 12 best olive oils

Choosing an olive oil is a surprising minefield. Save yourself the hassle with our handy guide
Rafa Benitez Real Madrid unveiling: New manager full of emotion at Bernabeu homecoming

Benitez full of emotion at Bernabeu homecoming

There were tears in the former Liverpool manager’s eyes as he was unveiled as Real Madrid coach. But the Spaniard knows he must make tough decisions if he is to succeed
Sepp Blatter resignation: The beginning of Fifa's long road to reform?

Does Blatter's departure mean Fifa will automatically clean up its act?

Don't bet on it, says Tom Peck
Charles Kennedy: The baby of the House who grew into a Lib Dem giant

The baby of the House who grew into a Lib Dem giant

Charles Kennedy was consistently a man of the centre-left, dedicated to social justice, but was also a champion of liberty and an opponent of the nanny-state, says Baroness Williams
Syria civil war: The harrowing testament of a five-year-old victim of this endless conflict

The harrowing testament of a five-year-old victim of Syria's endless civil war

Sahar Qanbar lost her mother and brother as civilians and government soldiers fought side by side after being surrounded by brutal Islamist fighters. Robert Fisk visited her
The future of songwriting: How streaming is changing everything we know about making music

The future of songwriting

How streaming is changing everything we know about making music
William Shemin and Henry Johnson: Jewish and black soldiers receive World War I Medal of Honor amid claims of discrimination

Recognition at long last

Jewish and black soldiers who fought in WWI finally receive medals after claims of discrimination
Beating obesity: The new pacemaker which helps over-eaters

Beating obesity

The new pacemaker which helps over-eaters
9 best women's festival waterproofs

Ready for rain: 9 best women's festival waterproofs

These are the macs to keep your denim dry and your hair frizz-free(ish)
Cycling World Hour Record: Nervous Sir Bradley Wiggins ready for pain as he prepares to go distance

Wiggins worried

Nervous Sir Bradley ready for pain as he prepares to attempt cycling's World Hour Record
Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

On your feet!

Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

The big NHS question

Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?