Arts and Entertainment

The presenter said she recognised details of the supposed ‘fake’, bought for just £400 from her work on a programme about the 17th century master

Capital games with capital gains inspired by the taxman and `Antiques Roadshow'

Capital games with capital gains inspired by the taxman and `Antiques Roadshow'

Letter: 'Crimewatch' and copycats

Sir: With reference to Jonathan Foster's report on the murder of Eve Howells, ("The family who killed their mother", 12 February), I am deeply concerned that a statement made by a 15-year-old murder defendant has been accepted by your newspaper as fact without any attempt at verification. I refer to the claim made that: "Glenn was inspired by the Crimewatch programme to take a hammer to his mother."

Boy battered mother to death for making his life `hell'

A sobbing teenager yesterday told a court how he smashed his mother's skull with a hammer and cried: "Sorry, Mum, I love you," as she lay dying. Speaking in whispers, Glenn Howells told how his domineering mother, Eve, made his life so unbearable with her shouting, swearing and mental cruelty that he finally snapped and killed her so he could be a "normal kid" like his friends.

Bring out your junk: it could be a star

TV is in the grip of antiques mania, reports Louise Jury

3 TO SEE

Ivanhoe (Sun BBC1) More swashbuckling than an Errol Flynn Convention.

LETTER : Viewers discount fantasy violence, study shows

Sir: A group of part-time mature students have just completed an experiment investigating the effect which viewing violent television might have on sentencing policy.

BBC presenter switches to C4

Former Crimewatch presenter Sue Cook is quitting the BBC after 20 years to front a major antiques show for Channel 4.

Letter: Yard denies issue of Stagg photo

Sir: It is unacceptable for Paul Donovan ("Deeply Suspect", 5 November) to claim that BBC 1's Crimewatch UK can "perpetrate injustice" on the strength of the subjective opinion of a fellow journalist.

THEATRE : Santa's sweet revenge

Boys' Stuff Crucible Studio, Sheffield

Citizen Kane: the `Antiques Roadshow' years

The revelation that there is now a collectors market in McDonald's ephemera is one of those facts that manages to combine shock and inevitability. You can't be serious . . . well, of course. Because the truth is that the collecting virus has only ever had a coincidental connection with discrimination or taste; it doesn't require beauty to thrive, just a minimal durability and relative scarcity. In Darwinian terms it is beautifully adapted as a parasite; each addition to the collection consolidate s its grip on the host organism, becomes a further reason to collect some more.

In the ratings war, the Winner loses all

IT WAS A brutal, premeditated axeing. Last week, Michael Winner's True Crimes (ITV), a programme loudly going on about its ratings, was savaged by an unrepentant programme controller. In mitigation, it has to be said that the perpetrator of the killing was at the back of a very long queue: Winner's show was generally regarded as the salacious, sensationalist end of the wedge of television crime re-enactment. Lest it be thought, however, that the slaying signalled the demise of the genre, last night's schedules came up more loaded with the stuff than a blagger's lock-up.

Letter: Guidelines on crime

Sir: May I clarify an important detail in your reporting of the BBC's guidelines on crime coverage (2 June)? The new guidelines apply to the BBC's national and regional news and current affairs programmes, not to programmes like Crimewatch. Crimewatch already has strict guidelines under which it has operated for many years, which prohibit the use of music, special sound effects, slow motion or any other artificial technique to increase dramatic tension.

BBC prepares guidelines in effort to curb fear of crime

NEW guidelines warning against sensationalised and gruesome crime reporting are to be issued to BBC staff in an attempt to reduce what the corporation sees as an exaggerated public fear of violent crime.

When moral panic is the real villain of the piece: Does television glamorise crime? Simon Shaps attacks hysteria over reconstruction series, while Tony Hall defends BBC news programmes

We are in the grip of a moral panic about crime on television. Quite when it started, or who was responsible, nobody can be sure, but a classic panic it most definitely is. Like some medieval plague, it springs from every sewer in a spontaneous overflow, reaches fever pitch, then mercifully subsides.

Real crimes re-enacted on TV 'fuel fears': Grade questions entertainment value

Crime programmes where real-life offences are re-enacted should no longer be screened until it is established whether they fuel viewers' fear of violence, the television chief, Michael Grade, said yesterday.
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