Arts and Entertainment

The presenter said she recognised details of the supposed ‘fake’, bought for just £400 from her work on a programme about the 17th century master

'Dreadful' silver fetches pounds 78,000

A WOMAN and her son who took some silver along to the BBC Antiques Roadshow, carrying it in an casual holdall because they were sure it was worth so little, saw it turn to gold at Christie's yesterday. Some 20 items which they thought too 'dreadful' even to give away fetched pounds 78,717, writes Dalya Alberge.

Dear Paul Condon: To the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, who has to handle the Prince of Wales's burglary. I don't envy you the job, but this is one crime you certainly won't solve by showing the loot on TV, says a viewer

Michael Howard has a nasty temper and I hope he wasn't too beastly yesterday when you had to report to him on the theft of the Prince of Wales's knick-knacks. But then if the heir to the throne can't take a skiing holiday without the attentions of the men with bags marked 'swag', how secure can the rest of us feel when we cancel the milk and papers, secure the triple locks and take off for our fortnight in Ilfracombe?

SHOW PEOPLE / Polish from the BBC chair man: Hugh Scully

'I WALKED into her office and started the usual small talk about what a charming room it was and what a lovely view and I do like your curtains. She didn't know me from Adam - she doesn't watch the The Antiques Roadshow, and she wasn't interested in my small talk about furnishings. She said, 'Yes, yes, come and sit down. Now tell me, what do you know about the Franco-Prussian war?' '

TELEVISION / Tabloid Television

Roger Cook, fresh from a violent contretemps with Spanish fishermen, gave his cameramen another run for their money when an interviewee set about his Mitsubishi Shogun with a baseball bat. His assailant's defence was that he is actually 'Mr Nice Guy, but that man brought out the worst in me'. Antiques Roadshow specialist Ian Harris was shot in the arm by a gunman during a robbery at his own jewellers, but revealed that he wasn't frightened by the experience; Ian McShane declared that he is quitting the eight-year-old Lovejoy (BBC1), and the show will be put quietly to bed; the Broadcasting Standards Council registered its disapproval of a number of the sex scenes in BBC1's Lady Chatterley; Des O'Connor, it was revealed by a hospital in Surrey, is top choice as background music requested by mothers who are to give birth; June Brown (Dot Cotton of EastEnders), made a casual remark about face-lifts and awoke the next morning to read she's a whisker away from having one.

Jeweller shot

Ian Harris, a jewellery specialist who regularly appears on BBC Television's Antiques Roadshow, was shot in the arm during a raid on his shop in Conduit Street, central London. One man was arrested, but a second escaped.

COLLECTABLES / On the roadshow to riches: Could granny's knick-knacks be valuable antiques? Madeleine Marsh goes behind the scenes of a TV show for the hopeful

LIKE MANY of its finds, the BBC's Antiques Roadshow has been in the family a long time. This month saw the launch of its 15th series, which will culminate in the 150th programme. Like the omnibus edition of The Archers, and newspapers by the kilo, it has become part of the Great British Sunday. It commands an audience of 13 - 14m (beaten only by the soaps in the BBC Top 10), and has caused a generation of viewers to root through its possessions looking for that little item inherited from granny, or bought from a jumble sale for 25p, which might be worth a fortune.

Experts quote a price for family treasures: Recession and high insurance premiums have encouraged people to seek a valuation of their heirlooms. Dalya Alberge reports

A WOMAN clutching two crumpled Safeway bags shuffled into Bonhams in Knightsbridge, central London. From one she pulled out a large framed print and placed it before the girl at the valuation desk. A print specialist was summoned to inspect it. Within seconds, he broke the news to her - gently. 'It's a photographic print. I'm afraid it's not worth much.'

Negus antiques draw a crowd

A buyer at the sale in Cheltenham yesterday of Arthur Negus's collection holds an oval, Faberge, gold-mounted easel frame valued at pounds 3,500- pounds 4,500. Hundreds attended to buy items belonging to the former Antiques Roadshow and Going for a Song presenter.

Media: Talk of the Trade: Relaxed over race

THE BROADCASTING Standards Council's research on how minority groups are depicted shows there is no apparent public anxiety over the use of reconstructions on programmes such as BBC 1's Crimewatch when they feature black criminals. Pressure groups such as the Bar's Race Committee argue that whenever these popular shows feature an unidentified black person, they result in an outbreak of harassment of black people by the police.

New leads on Nickell murder

Police investigating the murder of Rachel Nickell, 23, on Wimbledon Common, south-west London, in July were yesterday seeking two men named repeatedly during a flood of telephone calls after the television screening of a videofit of the man they believe is her killer.

TV antiques man's collection for sale

THE TREASURED collection of Britain's most famous antiques dealer, Arthur Negus, is set to go under the hammer next month.
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