Mandela attends funeral for great-granddaughter

Nelson Mandela made a rare public appearance yesterday to attend the funeral of his great-granddaughter, who died on the eve of the World Cup.

'It has united the Rainbow Nation. We have all gathered together'

From Table Mountain to Soweto yesterday, the pulsating chants of traditional songs and the blasting of plastic horns sounded the start of the first World Cup to be held on African soil.

South Africa take open-top bus tour... before first game

South Africa got its celebration in early yesterday as the national team paraded through Johannesburg in an open-top bus before a ball had been kicked at the continent's first World Cup.

Cow slaughtered outside Soccer City to welcome fans

South African tribal chiefs and healers have slaughtered a cow outside Soccer City, the biggest stadium at the World Cup, as part of rituals to appease the spirits of ancestors and welcome fans.

World Cup Watch: WAGs and celebrities

In anticipation of the World Cup, The Independent is running down the key people and factors to keep an eye out for in South Africa with our World Cup Watch series.

World Cup Watch: The Galacticos

In anticipation of the World Cup, The Independent is running down the key people and factors to keep an eye out for in South Africa with our World Cup Watch series.

Advocate of hatred who became a figure of fun

He never compromised his views, but Eugene Terreblanche's final years were marked by obscurity and absurdity.

While Zuma shops in Britain, students riot on campus

South African police yesterday used water cannons to disperse groups of protesting Johannesburg university students demanding the government provide free tertiary education for the poor.

The ten best England batting collapses

In celebration (or commiseration) of England's first innings batting in Johannesburg, we take a look at the great England batting collapses of yesteryear.

Lungi Sisulu: 'It was pointless fighting and hating'

They came at three in the morning, their regular calling time. He still remembers the fear of a 5 year-old boy, awoken in the dark by the shouts, the barking of police dogs and the threats. "They would come barging in turning the house and our beds upside down, searching, always searching."

Habana plays down altitude factor

Bryan Habana has warned South Africa should not pitch up at Loftus Versfeld on Saturday thinking the high altitude alone will help them overcome the British and Irish Lions in the second Test.

De Villiers relies on Bulls

Peter de Villiers, the Springbok coach, last night named a 28-strong party for the forthcoming three-Test series against the Lions. There was a predictably large, but still unnerving, representation from the Pretoria-based Bulls, whose Super 14 victory at Loftus Versfeld last weekend bordered on the breathtaking. Ten of that side have made the cut, along with a similar number from the Durban-based Sharks, including the captain, John Smit.

The Impostor, By Damon Galgut

Best known for his Man Booker shortlisted The Good Doctor, Galgut's long awaited sixth novel opens on a thrillerish note. Adam Napier is on his uppers, having recently lost both his job and his home.

Dr Nthato Motlana: Physician and anti-apartheid activist

Nthato Motlana had vivid memories of what it was like to be a black youth in 1940s South Africa: "The attitude of whites was monstrous," he said. "They were boors, animals. We lived a life of subservience, obsequiousness, fear, of obeisance to the white man in a way that nobody can really understand. When you saw a white man, you saw God Almighty and you had to get out of his way. He could kick you, he could kill you and get away with it."

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