George Harrison

Sultan Khan: Indian vocalist and doyen of the sarangi

Sultan Khan was a hereditary sarangiya – a sarangi player – and one of the preeminent Hindustani or Northern Indian classical soloists of our age. He played one of the most brutish-looking instruments humanity has ever devised. Yet the voices that he coaxed from this squat, bowed, stringed instrument were divine. The instrument's name derives from two words meaning "100 colours", but Sultan Khan proved that the sarangi hid many more than that. Many hold it to be the instrument able to capture the nuances and tonal range of the human voice the most faithfully. Many – Mickey Hart, the Grateful Dead drummer-turned-Smithsonian Folkwayswallah who recorded him included – hold sarangi to be the greatest melody instrument ever devised. And without question, Khan was one of sarangi's all-time virtuosi.

The Week in Radio: Satisfaction guaranteed with this guitar hero

Obviously, any rock legend hopes he'll die before he gets old, but there's always the possibility that taking all those substances will have a pickling effect. So post rehab and the comeback album, what's the coolest thing the veteran legend can do? The answer, surprisingly, seems to be radio. Bob Dylan, whose 70th birthday is being celebrated in style on BBC radio next week, delighted his fans by turning DJ for Theme Time Radio Hour. Others from Alice Cooper all the way to Barry Manilow have followed suit. Forget the old accessories of the pop star life, the yachts, the jets, the African orphans. For the music legend, a show of your own is the ultimate must-have and Ronnie Wood has it in spades.

Caught in the Net: Nu-folkers bare their teeth

You could call it the alt-folk answer to the 80s supergroup Traveling Wilburys. Bright Eyes' Conor Oberst, My Morning Jacket's Jim James, M Ward and the much-in-demand producer Mike Mogis have teamed up to form a new band called (with collective tongue in cheek) Monsters of Folk (left). The quartet's self-titled debut album arrives in late September. In advance of that, their first roar has arrived. Called 'Say Please', it largely dispenses with the folk and goes for more of a mid-tempo country rock feel. They're giving it away for free at www.monstersoffolk.com – all you have to do is say please, or more accurately, type "please". Granted, the Traveling Wilburys comparison is glib, but to compound it a little, consider this: for the group, Jim James is calling himself Yim Yames, for reasons unclear. It's a pseudonym he has also used for another recent project – 'Tribute To', a six-track EP of George Harrison covers, he of Traveling Wilburys among others. It gets a physical release on 4 August, but a digital version of it can be found at www.yimyames.com.

Album: Rolling Stones, Shine a Light (Universal)

Martin Scorsese has become the official hallmark of classic-rock-cred: first the Dylan documentary, then this Stones concert film, and next up, the George Harrison bio-doc. He's undoubtedly qualified for the job, but I'm not sure I want to hear him muttering "OK! First song!" over the opening of "Jumping Jack Flash": it imposes a too businesslike attitude over an event not exactly short of that commodity in the first place.

Neil Aspinall: Beatles' friend and road manager who became the boss of

Although Neil Aspinall could lay claim to being the "fifth Beatle", few outsiders knew who he was and indeed Paul McCartney publicly referred to him as "Mr X". He was rarely interviewed about his pivotal role in the Beatles' career, but he did make an exception for The Beatles Anthology television series in the mid 1990s and for the recent reissue of the film Help! Aspinall was first the group's friend and road manager, and then, as his trustworthiness and discretion were appreciated, came to manage the whole Beatles' empire, although he never had an official job title.

Neil Aspinall - a story worth telling

The title “The Fifth Beatle” has been conferred on various individuals for over 40 years. Brian Epstein and George Martin had solid claims to it, Pete Best and Stuart Sutcliffe, one time band members, also had claims. But Neil Aspinall, whose name few music fans know and even fewer would have recognised in the street, had one of the strongest claims of all.

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi: Spiritual leader who introduced millions,

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi was best known as the Beatles' spiritual adviser. During 1967 and 1968, his influence over the Beatles, as well as other western musicians, was at its peak and although their time with him was short, it had a marked impact on their lives and their music: we would not, for example, have the "White Album" without it.